English

Definition of although conjunction from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    although

     conjunction
    (also US English, informal altho) conjunction
    BrE BrE//ɔːlˈðəʊ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɔːlˈðoʊ//
     
     
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  1. 1  used for introducing a statement that makes the main statement in a sentence seem surprising synonym though Although the sun was shining, it wasn't very warm. Although small, the kitchen is well designed. Language BankhoweverWays of saying ‘but’ Politicians have promised to improve road safety. So far, however, little has been achieved. Despite clear evidence from road safety studies, no new measures have been introduced. Politicians have promised to improve road safety. In spite of this/Despite this, little has been achieved so far. Although politicians have promised to improve road safety, little has been achieved so far. Some politicians claim that the new transport policy has been a success. In fact, it has been a total disaster. Government campaigns have had a measure of success, but the fact remains that large numbers of accidents are still caused by careless drivers.
  2. 2  used to mean ‘but’ or ‘however’ when you are commenting on a statement I felt he was wrong, although I didn't say so at the time. Which Word?although / even though / though You can use these words to show contrast between two clauses or two sentences. Though is used more in spoken than in written English. You can use although, even though and though at the beginning of a sentence or clause that has a verb. Notice where the commas go:Although/​Even though/​Though everyone played well, we lost the game. We lost the game, although/​even though/​though everyone played well. You cannot use even on its own at the beginning of a sentence or clause instead of although, even though or though:Even everyone played well, we lost the game.
  3. Word Origin Middle English: from the adverb all + though.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: although