English

Definition of arise verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    arise

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈraɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈraɪz//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they arise
    BrE BrE//əˈraɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈraɪz//
     
    he / she / it arises
    BrE BrE//əˈraɪzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈraɪzɪz//
     
    past simple arose
    BrE BrE//əˈrəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈroʊz//
     
    past participle arisen
    BrE BrE//əˈrɪzn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈrɪzn//
     
    -ing form arising
    BrE BrE//əˈraɪzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈraɪzɪŋ//
     
    Protest
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive] (rather formal) (especially of a problem or a difficult situation) to happen; to start to exist synonym occur A new crisis has arisen. We keep them informed of any changes as they arise. Children should be disciplined when the need arises (= when it is necessary). A storm arose during the night.
  2. 2[intransitive] arise (out of/from something) (rather formal) to happen as a result of a particular situation injuries arising out of a road accident Emotional or mental problems can arise from a physical cause. Are there any matters arising from the minutes of the last meeting?
  3. 3[intransitive] (formal) to begin to exist or develop Several new industries arose in the town.
  4. 4[intransitive] (old use or literary) to get out of bed; to stand up He arose at dawn.
  5. 5[intransitive] arise (against somebody/something) (old use) to come together to protest about something or to fight for something The peasants arose against their masters. See related entries: Protest
  6. 6[intransitive] (literary) (of a mountain, a tall building, etc.) to become visible gradually as you move towards it
  7. Word Origin Old English ārīsan, from ā- ‘away’ (as an intensifier) + the verb rise.Extra examples Some learning difficulties arise from the way children are taught at school. The current debate arose out of the concerns of parents. Violence typically arises out of anger. A disagreement arose over who should pay for the trip. Ambiguity arises when students’ spoken English is very limited. Call this number if any unforeseen emergency should arise. Children should be disciplined when the need arises Difficulties arise when people fail to consult their colleagues. Doubts have arisen over the viability of the schedule. I’ll speak to him if the occasion arises. No one could remember exactly how the dispute had arisen. Somehow a misunderstanding arose. These animals don’t like water but will swim if the necessity arises. We will deal with that if the situation arises.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: arise