English

Definition of benefit verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    benefit

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they benefit
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪt//
     
    he / she / it benefits
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪts//
     
    past simple benefited
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    past participle benefited
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    past simple benefitted
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    past participle benefitted
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form benefiting
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪŋ//
     
    -ing form benefitting
    BrE BrE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbenɪfɪtɪŋ//
     
    Job skills and personal qualities
     
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  1. 1  [transitive] benefit somebody to be useful to somebody or improve their life in some way We should spend the money on something that will benefit everyone. See related entries: Job skills and personal qualities
  2. 2  [intransitive] benefit (from/by something) to be in a better position because of something Who exactly stands to benefit from these changes? Most crime victims benefit greatly by talking about their experiences.
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (originally denoting a kind deed or something well done): from Old French bienfet, from Latin benefactum ‘good deed’, from bene facere ‘do good (to)’.Extra examples The new law clearly benefits those earning the most money. We benefited directly from the reorganization. We both benefited financially from the arrangement. The new tax laws will clearly benefit those on low wages.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: benefit