Definition of book verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    book

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʊk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they book
    BrE BrE//bʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʊk//
     
    he / she / it books
    BrE BrE//bʊks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʊks//
     
    past simple booked
    BrE BrE//bʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʊkt//
     
    past participle booked
    BrE BrE//bʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bʊkt//
     
    -ing form booking
    BrE BrE//ˈbʊkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbʊkɪŋ//
     
    Plane travel, Soccer, Train and bus travel, Dining out, Staying in a hotel
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to arrange to have or use something on a particular date in the future; to buy a ticket in advance Book early to avoid disappointment. book something She booked a flight to Chicago. The performance is booked up (= there are no more tickets available). I'm sorry—we're fully booked. (British English) I'd like to book a table for two for 8 o'clock tonight. In American English book is not used if you do not have to pay in advance; instead use make a reservationI'd like to make a reservation for 8 o'clock tonight. compare reserve Wordfinderaccommodation, book, full board, holiday, hotel, reception, reservation, room service, suite, vacancy See related entries: Plane travel, Dining out, Staying in a hotel
  2. 2  [transitive] to arrange for somebody to have a seat on a plane, etc. book somebody + adv./prep. I've booked you on the 10 o'clock flight. book somebody something (+ adv./prep.) I've booked you a room at the Park Hotel. See related entries: Train and bus travel
  3. 3[transitive] book somebody/something (for something) to arrange for a singer, etc. to perform on a particular date We've booked a band for the wedding reception.
  4. 4[transitive] book somebody (for something) (informal) to write down somebody’s name and address because they have committed a crime or an offence He was booked for possession of cocaine.
  5. 5[transitive] book somebody (British English) (of a referee) to write down in an official book the name of a player who has broken the rules of the game See related entries: Soccer
  6. Word Origin Old English bōc (originally also ‘a document or charter’), bōcian ‘to grant by charter’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch boek and German Buch, and probably to beech (on which runes were carved).Extra examples Book with Suntours and kids go free! I’ve booked a table for two at a nice Italian restaurant. Seats go quickly, so it is essential to book in advance. There are few places on the course, so it is essential to book in advance. Have you booked the band for the party yet? He’s booked to appear on 3 November at Central Hall. I’ve booked you on the 9.30 flight. Several well-known authors have been booked to speak at the event. The hotel is fully booked that weekend. The seminars get quickly booked up. Phrasal Verbsbook in somethingbook somebody in something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: book