English

Definition of borrow verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    borrow

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒrəʊ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːroʊ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbɔːr//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they borrow
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒrəʊ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːroʊ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbɔːr//
     
    he / she / it borrows
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒrəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːroʊz//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbɔːroʊz//
     
    past simple borrowed
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒrəʊd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːroʊd//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbɔːroʊd//
     
    past participle borrowed
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒrəʊd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːroʊd//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbɔːroʊd//
     
    -ing form borrowing
    BrE BrE//ˈbɒrəʊɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɑːroʊɪŋ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbɔːroʊɪŋ//
     
    Buying a home, Banking
     
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  1. 1  [transitive] to take and use something that belongs to somebody else, and return it to them at a later time borrow something Can I borrow your umbrella? borrow something from somebody/something Members can borrow up to ten books from the library at any one time. borrow something off somebody (British English, informal) I borrowed the DVD off my brother. compare lend Which Word?borrow / lend These two words are often confused. You borrow something from someone else, while they lend it to you:Can I borrow your pen? Can I borrow a pen from you? Here, I’ll lend you my pen.
  2. 2  [transitive, intransitive] to take money from a person or bank and agree to pay it back to them at a later time borrow something (from somebody/something) How much did you have to borrow to pay for this? She borrowed £2 000 from her parents. borrow (from somebody/something) I don't like to borrow from friends. borrow something off somebody (informal) I had to borrow the money off a friend. compare lend See related entries: Buying a home, Banking
  3. 3[intransitive, transitive] to take words, ideas, etc. from another language, person, etc. and use them, as your own borrow (from somebody/something) The author borrows heavily from Henry James. borrow something (from somebody/something) Some musical terms are borrowed from Italian.
  4. Word Origin Old English borgian ‘borrow against security’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German borgen.Extra examples His designs borrow freely from the architecture of ancient Egypt. I borrowed £50 off my mum. I’ll borrow some coffee off the neighbours. She borrowed £50 from her mother. Can I borrow your pen? I don’t like to borrow from friends. I’m borrowing the office laptop for the weekend. You can borrow the book from the local library.Idioms
      be (living) on borrowed time
       
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    1. 1to still be alive after the time when you were expected to die He’s been living on borrowed time ever since his last heart attack.
    2. 2to be doing something that other people are likely to soon stop you from doing According to the latest opinion polls, the government is living on borrowed time.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: borrow