English

Definition of bound adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    bound

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//baʊnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//baʊnd//
     
    see also bind [not before noun]
     
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  1. 1  bound to do/be something certain or likely to happen, or to do or be something There are bound to be changes when the new system is introduced. It's bound to be sunny again tomorrow. You've done so much work—you're bound to pass the exam. It was bound to happen sooner or later (= we should have expected it). You're bound to be nervous the first time (= it's easy to understand). Synonymscertainbound sure definite guaranteedThese are all words describing something that will definitely happen or is definitely true.certain that you can rely on to happen or be true:It’s certain that they will agree. They are certain to agree.bound [not before noun] certain to happen, or to do or be something. Bound is only used in the phrase bound to do/​be, etc.:There are bound to be changes when the new system is introduced. You’ve done so much work—you’re bound to pass the exam.sure certain to happen or be true; that can be trusted or relied on:She’s sure to be picked for the team. It’s sure to rain.definite (rather informal) certain to happen; that is not going to change:Is it definite that he’s leaving?guaranteed certain to have a particular result:That kind of behaviour is guaranteed to make him angry.Patterns certain/​sure of something certain/​bound/​sure/​guaranteed to do something certain/​definite that… I couldn’t say for certain/​sure/​definite.
  2. 2forced to do something by law, duty or a particular situation bound by something We are not bound by the decision. You are bound by the contract to pay before the end of the month. bound (by something) to do something (formal) I am bound to say I disagree with you on this point. They are legally bound to appear in court.
  3. 3(in compounds) prevented from going somewhere or from working normally by the conditions mentioned Strike-bound travellers face long delays. fogbound airports
  4. 4(also in compounds) travelling, or ready to travel, in a particular direction or to a particular place homeward bound (= going home) Paris-bound northbound/southbound/eastbound/westbound bound for… a plane bound for Dublin
  5. Word Originadjective sense 4 Middle English boun (in the sense ‘ready, dressed’), from Old Norse búinn, past participle of búa ‘get ready’; the final -d is euphonic, or influenced by other adjective senses of bound.Extra examples He was legally bound to report them to the authorities. I felt in duty bound to report the incident. Officials are bound by law to investigate any possible fraud. The country will not be held bound by a treaty signed by the previous regime. The president said the country could not be held bound by a treaty signed by the previous regime. These problems were almost bound to arise. We are legally bound by this decision. tourists who are bound for Europe It was bound to happen sooner or later. It’s bound to be sunny again tomorrow. You’re bound to be nervous the first time. You’ve done so much work—you’re bound to pass the exam.Idioms
    be bound together by/in something
     
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    to be closely connected communities bound together by customs and traditions
    be bound up in something
     
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    very busy with something; very interested or involved in something He's too bound up in his work to have much time for his children.
    (North American English) very determined to do something I came here bound and determined to put the last 12 months behind me.
    bound up with something
     
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    closely connected with something From that moment my life became inextricably bound up with hers.
    (feel) honour-bound to do something
     
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    (formal) to feel that you must do something because of your sense of moral duty She felt honour-bound to attend as she had promised to. compare duty-bound
    (old-fashioned, British English, informal) I feel sure They’re up to some mischief, I’ll be bound!
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: bound