English

Definition of broach verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

broach

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//brəʊtʃ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//broʊtʃ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they broach
BrE BrE//brəʊtʃ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//broʊtʃ//
 
he / she / it broaches
BrE BrE//ˈbrəʊtʃɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbroʊtʃɪz//
 
past simple broached
BrE BrE//brəʊtʃt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//broʊtʃt//
 
past participle broached
BrE BrE//brəʊtʃt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//broʊtʃt//
 
-ing form broaching
BrE BrE//ˈbrəʊtʃɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈbroʊtʃɪŋ//
 
 
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broach something (to/with somebody) to begin talking about a subject that is difficult to discuss, especially because it is embarrassing or because people disagree about it She was dreading having to broach the subject of money to her father. The report fails to broach some important questions. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French brochier, based on Latin brocchus, broccus ‘projecting’. The earliest recorded sense was ‘prick with spurs’, generally ‘pierce’. The current sense is a figurative use of this and dates from the late 16th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: broach