English

Definition of buoy verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    buoy

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//bɔɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɔɪ//
     
    , also NAmE//ˈbuːi//
     
    [usually passive]Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they buoy
    BrE BrE//bɔɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɔɪ//
     
    , also NAmE//ˈbuːi//
     
    he / she / it buoys
    BrE BrE//bɔɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɔɪz//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbuːiz//
     
    past simple buoyed
    BrE BrE//bɔɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɔɪd//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbuːid//
     
    past participle buoyed
    BrE BrE//bɔɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//bɔɪd//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbuːid//
     
    -ing form buoying
    BrE BrE//ˈbɔɪɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈbɔɪɪŋ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈbuːiɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1buoy somebody (up) to make somebody feel cheerful or confident Buoyed by their win yesterday the team feel confident of further success. Knowing that all her friends were there buoyed up her spirits.
  2. 2buoy somebody/something (up) to keep somebody/something floating on water The raft was buoyed (up) by empty petrol cans.
  3. 3buoy something (up) to keep prices at a high or acceptable level Trading on Wall Street was buoyed in part by rising bond prices.
  4. Word Origin Middle English: probably from Middle Dutch boye, boeie, from a Germanic base meaning ‘signal’. The verb is from Spanish boyar ‘to float’, from boya ‘buoy’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: buoy

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