Definition of cadge verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

cadge

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//kædʒ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kædʒ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they cadge
BrE BrE//kædʒ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kædʒ//
 
he / she / it cadges
BrE BrE//ˈkædʒɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkædʒɪz//
 
past simple cadged
BrE BrE//kædʒd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kædʒd//
 
past participle cadged
BrE BrE//kædʒd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//kædʒd//
 
-ing form cadging
BrE BrE//ˈkædʒɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkædʒɪŋ//
 
 
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[transitive, intransitive] cadge (something) (from/off somebody) (British English, informal) to ask somebody for food, money, etc. especially because you cannot or do not want to pay for something yourself I managed to cadge some money off my dad. Word Origin early 17th cent. (in the dialect sense ‘carry about’): back-formation from the noun cadger, which dates from the late 15th cent., denoting (in northern English and Scots) a travelling dealer, which led to the verb sense ‘hawk, peddle’, giving rise to the current verb senses from the early 19th cent.