Definition of clean verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    clean

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kliːn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kliːn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they clean
    BrE BrE//kliːn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kliːn//
     
    he / she / it cleans
    BrE BrE//kliːnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kliːnz//
     
    past simple cleaned
    BrE BrE//kliːnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kliːnd//
     
    past participle cleaned
    BrE BrE//kliːnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kliːnd//
     
    -ing form cleaning
    BrE BrE//ˈkliːnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkliːnɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] clean (something) to make something free from dirt or dust by washing or rubbing it to clean the windows/bath/floor to clean a wound Have you cleaned your teeth? The villa is cleaned twice a week. I spent all day cooking and cleaning. see also dry-clean, spring-clean
  2. 2[intransitive] to become clean This oven cleans easily (= is easy to clean).
  3. 3[transitive] clean something = dry-clean This coat is filthy. I'll have it cleaned. Synonymscleanwash rinse cleanse dry-cleanThese words all mean to remove dirt from something, especially by using water and/​or soap.clean to remove dirt or dust from something, especially by using water or chemicals:The villa is cleaned twice a week. Have you cleaned your teeth? This coat is filthy. I’ll have it cleaned (= dry-cleaned).wash to remove dirt from something using water and usually soap:He quickly washed his hands and face. These jeans need washing.rinse to remove dirt, etc. from something using clean water only, not soap; to remove the soap from something with clean water after washing it:Make sure you rinse all the soap out.cleanse to clean your skin or a wound.dry-clean to clean clothes using chemicals instead of water.Patterns to clean/​wash/​rinse/​cleanse something in/​with something to clean/​wash/​rinse something from something to clean/​wash/​cleanse a wound to clean/​wash the car/​floor to wash/​rinse your hair to have something cleaned/​washed/​dry-cleaned
  4. 4[transitive] clean something to remove the inside parts of a fish, chicken, etc. before you cook it Clean the fish and remove the backbone.
  5. Word Origin Old English clǣne, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German klein ‘small’.Extra examples Ceramic tiles can be easily cleaned. Clean the glass with a soft cloth. He gently cleaned the wound and dressed it. I clean the house thoroughly once a week. I cleaned out all the cupboards. I cleaned the mud off the kitchen floor. She wiped her foot to clean away the blood. The freshly cleaned windows sparkled. This product cleans baths very effectively. Your shoes need cleaning! Have you cleaned your teeth? This coat is filthy. I’ll have it cleaned This oven cleans easily.Idioms
      clean house(North American English)
       
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    1. 1to remove people or things that are not necessary or wanted The new manager said he wanted to clean house.
    2. 2to make your house clean
    (informal) to start behaving in a moral or responsible way He cleaned up his act and came off drugs.
    Phrasal Verbsclean somethingdownclean something from somethingclean somethingoutclean somebody outclean somebody outclean upclean (yourself) upclean upclean somethingup
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: clean