Definition of collapse verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    collapse

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kəˈlæps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlæps//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they collapse
    BrE BrE//kəˈlæps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlæps//
     
    he / she / it collapses
    BrE BrE//kəˈlæpsɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlæpsɪz//
     
    past simple collapsed
    BrE BrE//kəˈlæps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlæps//
     
    past participle collapsed
    BrE BrE//kəˈlæps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlæps//
     
    -ing form collapsing
    BrE BrE//kəˈlæpsɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlæpsɪŋ//
     
    Economy, Construction, Being ill
     
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    of building
  1. 1  [intransitive] to fall down or fall in suddenly, often after breaking apart synonym give way The roof collapsed under the weight of snow. See related entries: Construction
  2. of sick person
  3. 2  [intransitive] to fall down (and usually become unconscious), especially because you are very ill/sick He collapsed in the street and died two hours later. See related entries: Being ill
  4. relax
  5. 3[intransitive] (informal) to sit or lie down and relax, especially after working hard When I get home I like to collapse on the sofa and listen to music.
  6. fail
  7. 4  [intransitive] to fail suddenly or completely synonym break down (2) Talks between management and unions have collapsed. All opposition to the plan has collapsed.
  8. of prices/currencies
  9. 5  [intransitive] to decrease suddenly in amount or value Share prices collapsed after news of poor trading figures. See related entries: Economy
  10. fold
  11. 6[intransitive, transitive] collapse (something) to fold something into a shape that uses less space; to be able to be folded in this way synonym fold The table collapses for easy storage.
  12. medical
  13. 7 [intransitive, transitive] collapse (something) if a lung or blood vessel collapses or is collapsed, it falls in and becomes flat and empty
  14. Word Origin early 17th cent. (as collapsed): from medical Latin collapsus, past participle of collabi, from col- ‘together’ + labi ‘to slip’.Extra examples He collapsed in a heap on the floor. He collapsed with shock. In November the strike finally collapsed. Several buildings have collapsed into the ocean. She collapsed suddenly from a heart attack. The man collapsed against the wall and slid down it. The scheme collapsed in the face of determined opposition. His building firm collapsed and he went bankrupt. She lost a lot of money when the property market collapsed. The coalition collapsed under the pressure of differences between the two parties. The home side collapsed spectacularly in the second half. The region’s economy has virtually collapsed. They finally arrived, collapsing from fatigue. Timber buildings may simply rot and collapse.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: collapse