English

Definition of collide verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    collide

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kəˈlaɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlaɪd//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they collide
    BrE BrE//kəˈlaɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlaɪd//
     
    he / she / it collides
    BrE BrE//kəˈlaɪdz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlaɪdz//
     
    past simple collided
    BrE BrE//kəˈlaɪdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlaɪdɪd//
     
    past participle collided
    BrE BrE//kəˈlaɪdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlaɪdɪd//
     
    -ing form colliding
    BrE BrE//kəˈlaɪdɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈlaɪdɪŋ//
     
    Motoring problems and accidents
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] if two people, vehicles, etc. collide, they crash into each other; if a person, vehicle, etc. collides with another, or with something that is not moving, they crash into it The car and the van collided head-on in thick fog. Two trains collided head-on. collide with something/somebody The car collided head-on with the van. As he fell, his head collided with the table. Synonymscrashslam collide smash wreckThese are all words that can be used when something, especially a vehicle, hits something else very hard and is damaged or destroyed.crash (rather informal) to hit an object or another vehicle, causing damage; to make a vehicle do this:I was terrified that the plane would crash.slam (something) into/​against somebody/​something to crash into something with a lot of force; to make something do this:The car skidded and slammed into a tree.collide (rather formal) (of two vehicles or people) to crash into each other; (of a vehicle or person) to crash into somebody/​something else:The car and the van collided head-on in thick fog.smash (rather informal) to crash into something with a lot of force; to make something do this; to crash a car:Ramraiders smashed a stolen car through the shop window.crash, slam or smash?Crash is used especially to talk about vehicles and can be used without a preposition:We’re going to crash, aren’t we? In this meaning slam and smash always take a preposition:We’re going to slam/​smash, aren’t we? They are used for a much wider range of things than just vehicles. Crash can also be used for other things, if used with a preposition:He crashed down the telephone receiver.wreck to crash a vehicle and damage it so badly that it is not worth repairingPatterns two vehicles crash/​collide two vehicles crash/​slam/​smash into each other to crash/​smash/​wreck a car See related entries: Motoring problems and accidents
  2. 2[intransitive] collide (with somebody) (over something) (formal) (of people, their opinions, etc.) to disagree strongly They regularly collide over policy decisions.
  3. see also collision
    Word Origin early 17th cent. (in the sense ‘cause to collide’): from Latin collidere, from col- ‘together’ + laedere ‘to strike’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: collide