English

Definition of comfort verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

comfort

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈkʌmfət//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌmfərt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they comfort
BrE BrE//ˈkʌmfət//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌmfərt//
 
he / she / it comforts
BrE BrE//ˈkʌmfəts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌmfərts//
 
past simple comforted
BrE BrE//ˈkʌmfətɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌmfərtɪd//
 
past participle comforted
BrE BrE//ˈkʌmfətɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌmfərtɪd//
 
-ing form comforting
BrE BrE//ˈkʌmfətɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈkʌmfərtɪŋ//
 
Kind
 
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to make somebody who is worried or unhappy feel better by being kind and sympathetic towards them comfort somebody The victim's widow was today being comforted by family and friends. She comforted herself with the thought that it would soon be spring. He was comforted to know that most people in the class knew even less than he. The idea that he was not alone comforted him greatly. it comforts somebody to do something It comforted her to feel his arms around her. See related entries: KindWord Familycomfort noun verbcomfortable adjective (uncomfortable)comfortably adverb (uncomfortably)comforting adjective Word Origin Middle English (as a noun, in the senses ‘strengthening, support, consolation’; as a verb, in the senses ‘strengthen, give support, console’): from Old French confort (noun), conforter (verb), from late Latin confortare ‘strengthen’, from com- (expressing intensive force) + Latin fortis ‘strong’. The sense ‘something producing physical ease’ arose in the mid 17th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: comfort