English

Definition of complex noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    complex

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmpleks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmpleks//
     
    Mental and emotional problems
     
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  1. 1a group of buildings of a similar type together in one place a sports complex an industrial complex (= a site with many factories) Synonymsbuildingproperty premises complex structure blockThese are all words for a structure such as a house, office block or factory that has a roof and four wallsbuilding a structure such as a house, office block or factory that has a roof and four wallsproperty a building or buildings and the surrounding land; land and buildings:We have a buyer who would like to view the property. The price of property has risen enormously. This word is often used when talking about buying/​selling houses or other buildings and land.premises [pl.] the building or buildings and surrounding land that a business owns or uses:The company is looking for larger premises.complex a group of buildings of a similar type together in one place:a leisure complexstructure a thing that is made of several parts, especially a building:The pier is a wooden structure.block (British English) a tall building that contains flats or offices; a building that forms part of a school, hospital, etc. and is used for a particular purpose:a block of flats the school’s science blockPatterns a(n) commercial/​industrial/​residential building/​property/​premises/​complex/​block an apartment building/​complex/​block a/​the school building/​premises to build a property/​complex/​structure/​block to put up a building/​property/​structure/​block to demolish/​pull down a building/​property/​complex/​structure/​block
  2. 2a group of things that are connected This is just one of a whole complex of issues.
  3. 3(especially in compounds) a mental state that is not normal to suffer from a guilt complex see also inferiority complex, Oedipus complex, persecution complex See related entries: Mental and emotional problems
  4. 4if somebody has a complex about something, they are worried about it in way that is not normal Don’t mention her weight—she has a complex about it. See related entries: Mental and emotional problems
  5. Word Origin mid 17th cent. (in the sense ‘group of related elements’): from Latin complexus, past participle (used as a noun) of complectere ‘embrace, comprise’, later associated with complexus ‘plaited’; the adjective is partly via French complexe.Extra examples Don’t keep on at him about his handwriting or he’ll get a complex. She has a complex about her big ears. Don’t mention her weight—she has a complex about it. He suffers from a guilt complex. He will be just one detective working amongst a much bigger complex of colleagues. There is a huge complex of different traditions and religions in the area. a leisure/​sports/​shopping complex
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: complex