English

Definition of compromise verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    compromise

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmprəmaɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmprəmaɪz//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they compromise
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmprəmaɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmprəmaɪz//
     
    he / she / it compromises
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmprəmaɪzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmprəmaɪzɪz//
     
    past simple compromised
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmprəmaɪzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmprəmaɪzd//
     
    past participle compromised
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmprəmaɪzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmprəmaɪzd//
     
    -ing form compromising
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒmprəmaɪzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːmprəmaɪzɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to give up some of your demands after a disagreement with somebody, in order to reach an agreement Neither side is prepared to compromise. compromise (with somebody) (on something) After much argument, the judges finally compromised on (= agreed to give the prize to) the 18-year old pianist. They were unwilling to compromise with the terrorists.
  2. 2[transitive, intransitive] to do something that is against your principles or does not reach standards that you have set compromise something I refuse to compromise my principles. compromise (on something) We are not prepared to compromise on safety standards.
  3. 3[transitive] compromise somebody/something/yourself to bring somebody/something/yourself into danger or under suspicion, especially by acting in a way that is not very sensible She had already compromised herself by accepting his invitation. Defeat at this stage would compromise their chances (= reduce their chances) of reaching the finals of the competition.
  4. Word Origin late Middle English (denoting mutual consent to arbitration): from Old French compromis, from late Latin compromissum ‘a consent to arbitration’, neuter past participle of compromittere, from com- ‘together’ + promittere ‘put forth, promise’, from pro- ‘forward’ + mittere ‘send’.Extra examples He wanted his own way and refused to compromise. The affair seriously compromised the party’s prospects of electoral success. They debated whether to compromise with the opposition parties. Unions and management seem ready to compromise on the level of the increase. After much argument, the judges finally compromised on the 18-year-old pianist. Defeat at this stage would compromise their chances of reaching the finals of the competition. She has already compromised herself by accepting his invitation. They were unwilling to compromise with the Communists.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: compromise

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