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Definition of confident adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    confident

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//ˈkɒnfɪdənt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɑːnfɪdənt//
     
    Confident
     
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  1. 1  feeling sure about your own ability to do things and be successful She was in a relaxed, confident mood. Beneath his confident and charming exterior, lurked a mass of insecurities. The teacher wants the children to feel confident about asking questions when they don't understand. see also self-confident See related entries: Confident
  2. 2  feeling certain that something will happen in the way that you want or expect confident of something/doing something The team feels confident of winning. confident that… I'm confident that you will get the job. She was quietly confident that everything would go as planned. Synonymssureconfident convinced certain positive clearThese words all describe somebody who knows without doubt that something is true or will happen.sure [not before noun] without any doubt that you are right, that something is true, that you will get something or that something will happen:‘Is that John over there?’ ‘I’m not sure.’ Are you sure about that? England must win this game to be sure of qualifying. Sure is often used in negative statements and questions, because there is some doubt or anxiety over the matter. If there is no doubt, people often say quite sure:I’m quite sure (that) I left my bag here (= I have no doubt about it).confident completely sure that something will happen in the way that you want or expect:I’m quite confident that you’ll get the job. The team feels confident of winning. Confident is a stronger and more definite word than sure and is more often used in positive statements, when you feel no anxiety.convinced [not before noun] completely sure that something is true or right, especially because the evidence seems to prove it or somebody else has persuaded you to believe it:I’m convinced that she’s innocent.certain [not usually before noun] sure that you are right or that something is true:Are you absolutely certain about this?sure or certain?Like sure, certain is often used in negative statements and questions. It is slightly more formal than sure; sure is more frequent, especially in spoken English.positive [not before noun] (rather informal) completely sure that something is true:She was positive that he’d been there. ‘Are you sure?’ ‘Positive.’clear (often used in negative statements and questions) having no doubt or confusion about something:My memory isn’t really clear on that point.Patterns sure/​confident/​convinced/​certain/​positive/​clear about something sure/​confident/​convinced/​certain of something sure/​confident/​convinced/​certain/​positive/​clear that… sure/​certain/​clear who/​what/​how, etc. to feel sure/​confident/​convinced/​certain/​positive quite/​absolutely/​completely/​fairly/​pretty sure/​confident/​convinced/​certain/​positive/​clear not altogether sure/​confident/​convinced/​certain/​clear
  3. Word Origin late 16th cent.: from French confident(e), from Italian confidente, from Latin confident- ‘having full trust’, from the verb confidere, from con- (expressing intensive force) + fidere ‘trust’.Extra examples Going to university has made her more confident. He came out of the interview feeling quietly confident. He was overly confident, perhaps to the point of arrogance. He’s becoming more confident as he gets older. I’m 95% confident of success. I’m fully confident of winning the title. I’m very confident in our ability to maintain leadership. She gradually grew more confident. She sauntered onto the set, looking serenely confident. We are confident about the future. We feel confident that these results are accurate. You get young people who appear to be socially confident, but inside they are a bundle of neuroses. young people who appear to be socially confident, but inside are a bundle of neuroses I’m quite confident that you’ll get the job. They gave a confident prediction that things would improve. They gave a very confident performance of the piece.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: confident

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