Definition of corner noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    corner

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈkɔːnə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɔːrnər//
     
    Features of roads, Soccer
     
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    of building/object/shape
  1. 1  a part of something where two or more sides, lines or edges join the four corners of a square Write your address in the top right-hand corner of the letter. I hit my knee on the corner of the table. A smile lifted the corner of his mouth. a speck of dirt in the corner of her eye
  2. -cornered
  3. 2(in adjectives) with the number of corners mentioned; involving the number of groups mentioned a three-cornered hat a three-cornered fight
  4. of room/box
  5. 3  the place inside a room or a box where two sides join; the area around this place There was a television in the far corner of the room. a corner table/seat/cupboard
  6. of roads
  7. 4  a place where two streets join There was a group of youths standing on the street corner. Turn right at the corner of Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards. There’s a hotel on/at the corner of my street. The wind hit him as he turned the corner.
  8. 5  a sharp bend in a road The car was taking the corners too fast. See related entries: Features of roads
  9. area/region
  10. 6a region or an area of a place (sometimes used for one that is far away or difficult to reach) She lives in a quiet corner of rural Yorkshire. Students come here from the four corners of the world. He knew every corner of the old town.
  11. difficult situation
  12. 7[usually singular] a difficult situation to back/drive/force somebody into a corner They had got her in a corner, and there wasn't much she could do about it. He was used to talking his way out of tight corners.
  13. in sport
  14. 8(in sports such as football (soccer ) and hockey) a free kick or hit that you take from the corner of your opponent’s end of the field to take a corner The referee awarded a corner. see also corner kick See related entries: Soccer
  15. 9(in boxing and wrestling) any of the four corners of a ring1; the supporters who help in the corner
  16. Word Origin Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French, based on Latin cornu ‘horn, tip, corner’.Extra examples A white van came round the corner. As they turned the corner all the bags slid to one side. Beckham took the corner and Scholes headed it into the net. He found a quiet corner and got on with his work. He managed to force a corner. He parked in the far corner of the car park. He pushed the thought back into the darkest corner of his mind. He put the goalkeeper under pressure and managed to force a corner. He took a seat in the far corner of the cafe. He was used to having to talk his way out of tight corners. I hate coming out of that lane because it’s a blind corner. I’m in a bit of a corner over finding staff for Friday evening. It’s a rather sharp corner and she took it a little too fast. James blocked the shot but conceded a corner. Make sure the staircase is well lit, with no awkward corners. Moore took the corner. Put your address in the top right-hand corner of the page. She sat in a dark corner of the room. She tucked herself away in a corner and read all day. Smooth rounded corners make cleaning easier. The box had been tucked away in an odd corner of the attic. The waiter led us to a corner table. There were a lot of young men hanging about on street corners. They chose a table right in the corner of the restaurant. They had got her in a corner and there was nothing she could do about it. Turn right at the first corner. Welcome to our little corner of Philadelphia. a cool shady corner of the garden a remote corner of Afghanistan at the corner of West Street and Park Street the bank on the corner of Mount Street the four corners of his bed the local corner shop/​store He had her backed into a corner a couple of times with new facts she didn’t know. It is important to avoid being pushed into a corner. The wind hit him as he turned the corner. There was a large group of youths standing on the street corner. There’s a hotel on the corner of my street. They had got him into a corner and there wasn’t much he could do about it. Turn right at the corner of Avalon Road and Radnor Street.Idioms
    (just) around/round the corner
     
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    very near Her house is just around the corner. (figurative) There were good times around the corner (= they would soon come).
    cut the corner(also cut off the corner especially in British English)
     
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    to go across the corner of an area and not around the sides of it, because it is quicker There’s a worn patch on the grass because everyone cuts (off) the corner.
    (disapproving) to do something in the easiest, cheapest or quickest way, often by ignoring rules or leaving something out To be competitive, they paid low wages and cut corners on health and safety.
    fight your/somebody’s corner
     
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    (British English) to defend your/somebody’s position against other people
    see something out of the corner of your eye
     
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    to see something by accident or not very clearly because you see it from the side of your eye and are not looking straight at it Out of the corner of her eye, she saw him coming closer.
    a very difficult or dangerous situation She’ll always help if you’re in a tight spot. to pass a very important point in an illness or a difficult situation and begin to improve
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: corner