Definition of correct verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    correct

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kəˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈrekt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they correct
    BrE BrE//kəˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈrekt//
     
    he / she / it corrects
    BrE BrE//kəˈrekts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈrekts//
     
    past simple corrected
    BrE BrE//kəˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈrektɪd//
     
    past participle corrected
    BrE BrE//kəˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈrektɪd//
     
    -ing form correcting
    BrE BrE//kəˈrektɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kəˈrektɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  correct something to make something right or accurate, for example by changing it or removing mistakes Read through your work and correct any mistakes that you find. Their eyesight can be corrected in just a few minutes by the use of a laser. They issued a statement correcting the one they had made earlier.
  2. 2  correct something (of a teacher) to mark the mistakes in a piece of work (and sometimes give a mark/grade to the work) I spent all evening correcting essays.
  3. 3to tell somebody that they have made a mistake correct somebody Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this last year's brochure? Yes, you're right—I stand corrected (= I accept that I made a mistake). correct (somebody) + speech ‘It's Yates, not Wates,’ she corrected him. Express YourselfCorrecting yourselfWhen you say something that was not quite what you intended, you can correct yourself in various ways: I'll be there at five fifteen, I mean five fifty—ten to six. It'll be Tuesday—sorry, I meant to say Thursday. Sorry, what I mean is, we need two handouts per person. We can meet in the conference centre—or rather in front of the centre. The painter—or should I say, the sculptor—was born in Padua. It's one t and double s—no, sorry, one s and double t. It's on the fifth floor—no, actually, it's the fourth. Can I get two lattes and an espresso—no, scratch that, three lattes. (North American English, informal)
  4. Word Origin Middle English (as a verb): from Latin correct- ‘made straight, amended’, from the verb corrigere, from cor- ‘together’ + regere ‘guide’. The adjective is via French.Extra examples ‘She’s his girlfriend.’ ‘His sister,’ Ian corrected. At this stage you should be able to correct at least some of your own mistakes. I’d like to correct the impression that my client has any kind of criminal record. It’s simply not true that teachers no longer correct bad spellings. Minor problems with eyesight can now be corrected in a few seconds. They issued a statement correcting what they had said earlier. When I’ve corrected your assignments, I want you to write them out again.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: correct