English

Definition of creature noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    creature

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈkriːtʃə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkriːtʃər//
     
     
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  1. 1  a living thing, real or imaginary, that can move around, such as an animal The dormouse is a shy, nocturnal creature. respect for all living creatures strange creatures from outer space
  2. 2(especially following an adjective) a person, considered in a particular way You pathetic creature! She was an exotic creature with long red hair and brilliant green eyes. He always goes to bed at ten—he's a creature of habit (= he likes to do the same things at the same time every day).
  3. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘something created’): via Old French from late Latin creatura, from the verb creare ‘to produce’.Extra examples Dogs are more social creatures than cats. I dreamt of evil creatures who were trying to catch me. It is awesome to see these magnificent creatures in flight. The newborn young are helpless creatures and easy prey for birds. These timid little creatures exude a pungent smell when threatened. Woodland creatures such as foxes and owls are increasingly common in towns. a strange creature from another planet the wild creatures of the forest Goblins and other dangerous creatures lurked inside the cave. He always goes to bed at ten—he’s a creature of habit. She was a sociable creature; she liked people. We share the land with all living creatures and have a duty to preserve its riches. a complex/​unhappy/​sociable creature a poor/​pathetic/​sad/​charming creatureIdioms
    a/the creature of somebody, somebody’s creature
     
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    (formal, disapproving) a person or thing that depends completely on somebody else and is controlled by them
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: creature

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