English

Definition of dawn verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    dawn

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//dɔːn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɔːn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they dawn
    BrE BrE//dɔːn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɔːn//
     
    he / she / it dawns
    BrE BrE//dɔːnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɔːnz//
     
    past simple dawned
    BrE BrE//dɔːnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɔːnd//
     
    past participle dawned
    BrE BrE//dɔːnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɔːnd//
     
    -ing form dawning
    BrE BrE//ˈdɔːnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɔːnɪŋ//
     
    The sun and the moon
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] (of a day or a period of time) to begin The following morning dawned bright and warm. A new technological age had dawned. See related entries: The sun and the moon
  2. 2[intransitive] to become obvious or easy to understand Slowly the awful truth dawned.
  3. Word Origin late 15th cent. (as a verb): back-formation from Middle English dawning alteration of earlier dawing, from Old English dagian ‘to dawn’, of Germanic origin.Extra examples It slowly dawned on me that he might have been mistaken. It was beginning to dawn on her that she had been fooled. The day dawned bright and sunny. The dreadful truth finally dawned on me.Idioms
    (the) light dawned (on somebody)
     
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    somebody suddenly understood or began to understand something I puzzled over the problem for ages before the light suddenly dawned.
    Phrasal Verbsdawn on somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: dawn