English

Definition of deduce verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

deduce

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//dɪˈdjuːs//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈduːs//
 
(formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they deduce
BrE BrE//dɪˈdjuːs//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈduːs//
 
he / she / it deduces
BrE BrE//dɪˈdjuːsɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈduːsɪz//
 
past simple deduced
BrE BrE//dɪˈdjuːst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈduːst//
 
past participle deduced
BrE BrE//dɪˈdjuːst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈduːst//
 
-ing form deducing
BrE BrE//dɪˈdjuːsɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈduːsɪŋ//
 
 
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to form an opinion about something based on the information or evidence that is available synonym infer deduce something (from something) We can deduce a lot from what people choose to buy. deduce (from something) that, what, how, etc… Can we deduce from your silence that you do not approve? see also deduction Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘lead or convey’): from Latin deducere, from de- ‘down’ + ducere ‘lead’.Extra examples Using the evidence available it is possible to deduce quite a lot about how these people lived. We deduce from his behaviour that he is trying to gain attention. We deduced from his absences that he was not happy at college. Can we deduce from your silence that you don’t approve? She deduced that he couldn’t have been at home when the attack took place. Try to deduce what might have happened next. We can deduce a lot from what people spend their money on.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: deduce