Definition of definite adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    definite

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//ˈdefɪnət//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdefɪnət//
     
     
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  1. 1  definite (that…) sure or certain; unlikely to change Can you give me a definite answer by tomorrow? Is it definite that he's leaving? I've heard rumours, but nothing definite. a definite offer of a job I'm not sure—I can find out for definite if you like. That's definite then, is it? They have very definite ideas on how to bring up children. Synonymscertainbound sure definite guaranteedThese are all words describing something that will definitely happen or is definitely true.certain that you can rely on to happen or be true:It’s certain that they will agree. They are certain to agree.bound [not before noun] certain to happen, or to do or be something. Bound is only used in the phrase bound to do/​be, etc.:There are bound to be changes when the new system is introduced. You’ve done so much work—you’re bound to pass the exam.sure certain to happen or be true; that can be trusted or relied on:She’s sure to be picked for the team. It’s sure to rain.definite (rather informal) certain to happen; that is not going to change:Is it definite that he’s leaving?guaranteed certain to have a particular result:That kind of behaviour is guaranteed to make him angry.Patterns certain/​sure of something certain/​bound/​sure/​guaranteed to do something certain/​definite that… I couldn’t say for certain/​sure/​definite.
  2. 2  easily or clearly seen or understood; obvious synonym clear The look on her face was a definite sign that something was wrong. There was a definite feeling that things were getting worse.
  3. 3[not before noun] definite (about something) | definite (that…) (of a person) sure that something is true or that something is going to happen and stating it to other people I'm definite about this.
  4. Word Origin mid 16th cent.: from Latin definitus ‘defined, set within limits’, past participle of definire, from de- (expressing completion) + finire ‘finish’.Extra examples He was pretty definite about the price. She has very definite views on this subject. Have they made you a definite offer of a job? I need a definite yes or no. I’m not sure—I can find out for definite if you like. I’ve heard rumours, but nothing definite. Is it definite that he’s leaving?
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: definite

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