English

Definition of depreciate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    depreciate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they depreciate
    BrE BrE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪt//
     
    he / she / it depreciates
    BrE BrE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪts//
     
    past simple depreciated
    BrE BrE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪtɪd//
     
    past participle depreciated
    BrE BrE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form depreciating
    BrE BrE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈpriːʃieɪtɪŋ//
     
    Economy
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to become less valuable over a period of time New cars start to depreciate as soon as they are on the road. Shares continued to depreciate on the stock markets today. opposite appreciate
  2. 2[transitive] depreciate something (business) to reduce the value, as stated in the company’s accounts, of a particular asset over a particular period of time The bank depreciates PCs over a period of five years. See related entries: Economy
  3. 3[transitive] depreciate something (formal) to make something seem unimportant or of no value I had no intention of depreciating your contribution.
  4. Word Origin late Middle English (in sense (2)): from late Latin depreciat- ‘lowered in price, undervalued’, from the verb depreciare, from Latin de- ‘down’ + pretium ‘price’.Extra examples Cars depreciate in value rapidly. Sterling is expected to depreciate against the dollar. The peso depreciated by 9%. The rupee depreciated by 9 per cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: depreciate