Definition of desire verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    desire

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪər//
     
    (not used in the progressive tenses)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they desire
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪər//
     
    he / she / it desires
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪərz//
     
    past simple desired
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪərd//
     
    past participle desired
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪərd//
     
    past simple desiring
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪərɪŋ//
     
    past participle desiring
    BrE BrE//dɪˈzaɪərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈzaɪərɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  (formal) to want something; to wish for something desire something We all desire health and happiness. The house had everything you could desire. The dessert can be topped with cream, if desired(= if you like). The medicine did not achieve the desired effect. desire (somebody/something) to do something Fewer people desire to live in the north of the country.
  2. 2desire somebody to be sexually attracted to somebody He still desired her.
  3. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French desir (noun), desirer (verb), from Latin desiderare, perhaps from de- ‘down’ + sidus, sider- ‘star’.Extra examples A home of her own was something she had always very much desired. Most countries sincerely desired peace. He still desired her, and she him. The dessert can be topped with cream, if desired. The medicine did not achieve the desired effect.Idioms
    leave a lot, much, something, etc. to be desired
     
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    to be bad or unacceptable The service in the restaurant left a lot to be desired.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: desire

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