English

Definition of detest verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

detest

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//dɪˈtest//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtest//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they detest
BrE BrE//dɪˈtest//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtest//
 
he / she / it detests
BrE BrE//dɪˈtests//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtests//
 
past simple detested
BrE BrE//dɪˈtestɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtestɪd//
 
past participle detested
BrE BrE//dɪˈtestɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtestɪd//
 
past simple detesting
BrE BrE//dɪˈtestɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtestɪŋ//
 
past participle detesting
BrE BrE//dɪˈtestɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈtestɪŋ//
 
 
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(not used in the progressive tenses) detest somebody/something | detest doing something to hate somebody/something very much synonym loathe They detested each other on sight. They absolutely detest each other. Synonymshatedislike can’t stand despise can’t bear loathe detestThese words all mean to have a strong feeling of dislike for somebody/​something.hate to have a strong feeling of dislike for somebody/​something. Although hate is generally a very strong verb, it is also commonly used in spoken or informal English to talk about people or things that you dislike in a less important way, for example a particular type of food:He hates violence in any form. I’ve always hated cabbage.dislike (rather formal) to not like somebody/​something. Dislike is a rather formal word; it is less formal, and more usual, to say that you don’t like somebody/​something, especially in spoken English:I don’t like it when you phone me so late at night.can’t stand (rather informal) used to emphasize that you really do not like somebody/​something:I can’t stand his brother. She couldn’t stand being kept waiting.despise to dislike and have no respect for somebody/​something:He despised himself for being so cowardly.can’t bear used to say that you dislike something so much that you cannot accept or deal with it:I can’t bear having cats in the house.can’t stand or can’t bear?In many cases you can use either word, but can’t bear is slightly stronger and slightly more formal than can’t stand. loathe to hate somebody/​something very much:They loathe each other. Loathe is generally an even stronger verb than hate, but it can also be used more informally to talk about less important things, meaning ‘really don’t like’:Whether you love or loathe their music, you can’t deny their talent.detest (rather formal) to hate somebody/​something very much:They absolutely detest each other.Patterns I hate/​dislike/​can’t stand/​can’t bear/​loathe/​detest doing something. I hate/​can’t bear to do something. I hate/​dislike/​can’t stand/​can’t bear it when… I really hate/​dislike/​can’t stand/​despise/​can’t bear/​detest somebody/​something. I absolutely hate/​can’t stand/​loathe/​detest somebody/​something. Word Origin late 15th cent.: from Latin detestari, from de- ‘down’ + testari ‘witness, call upon to witness’ (from testis ‘a witness’).
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: detest