Definition of direct verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    direct

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//dəˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dəˈrekt//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekt//
     
    ; BrE BrE//daɪˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//daɪˈrekt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they direct
    BrE BrE//dəˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dəˈrekt//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekt//
     
    ; BrE BrE//daɪˈrekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//daɪˈrekt//
     
    he / she / it directs
    BrE BrE//dəˈrekts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dəˈrekts//
     
    ; BrE BrE//dɪˈrekts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈrekts//
     
    ; BrE BrE//daɪˈrekts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//daɪˈrekts//
     
    past simple directed
    BrE BrE//dəˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dəˈrektɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//dɪˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈrektɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//daɪˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//daɪˈrektɪd//
     
    past participle directed
    BrE BrE//dəˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dəˈrektɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//dɪˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈrektɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//daɪˈrektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//daɪˈrektɪd//
     
    -ing form directing
    BrE BrE//dəˈrektɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dəˈrektɪŋ//
     
    ; BrE BrE//dɪˈrektɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪˈrektɪŋ//
     
    ; BrE BrE//daɪˈrektɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//daɪˈrektɪŋ//
     
    Producing a play, Making films
     
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    aim
  1. 1  [transitive] to aim something in a particular direction or at a particular person direct something at something/somebody The machine directs a powerful beam at the affected part of the body. Was that remark directed at me? direct something to/towards something/somebody There are three main issues that we need to direct our attention to. direct something against something/somebody Most of his anger was directed against himself.
  2. control
  3. 2  [transitive] direct somebody/something to control or be in charge of somebody/something A new manager has been appointed to direct the project. He was asked to take command and direct operations.
  4. movie/play/music
  5. 3  [intransitive, transitive] to be in charge of actors in a play, or a film/movie, or musicians in an orchestra, etc. She prefers to act rather than direct. direct somebody/something The movie was directed by Steven Spielberg. She now directs a large choir. CollocationsCinema/​the moviesWatching go to/​take somebody to (see) a film/​movie go to/​sit in (British English) the cinema/(North American English) the (movie) theater rent a film/​movie/​DVD download/​stream a film/​movie burn/​copy/​rip a DVD see/​watch a film/​movie/​DVD/​preview/​trailerShowing show/​screen a film/​movie promote/​distribute/​review a film/​movie (British English) be on at the cinema be released on/​come out on/​be out on DVD captivate/​delight/​grip/​thrill the audience do well/​badly at the box office get a lot of/​live up to the hypeFilm-making write/​co-write a film/​movie/​script/​screenplay direct/​produce/​make/​shoot/​edit a film/​movie/​sequel make a romantic comedy/​a thriller/​an action movie do/​work on a sequel/​remake film/​shoot the opening scene/​an action sequence/​footage (of something) compose/​create/​do/​write the soundtrack cut/​edit (out) a scene/​sequenceActing have/​get/​do an audition get/​have/​play a leading/​starring/​supporting role play a character/​James Bond/​the bad guy act in/​appear in/​star in a film/​movie/​remake do/​perform/​attempt a stunt work in/​make it big in Hollywood forge/​carve/​make/​pursue a career in HollywoodDescribing films the camera pulls back/​pans over something/​zooms in (on something) the camera focuses on something/​lingers on something shoot somebody/​show somebody in extreme close-up use odd/​unusual camera angles be filmed/​shot on location/​in a studio be set/​take place in London/​in the ’60s have a happy ending/​plot twist See related entries: Producing a play, Making films
  6. show the way
  7. 4  [transitive] direct somebody (to…) to tell or show somebody how to get to somewhere or where to go Could you direct me to the station? A police officer was directing the traffic. He was directed to a table beside the window. Synonymstakelead escort drive show walk guide usher directThese words all mean to go with somebody from one place to another.take to go with somebody from one place to another, for example in order to show them something or to show them the way to a place:It’s too far to walk—I’ll take you by car.lead to go with or go in front of somebody in order to show them the way or to make them go in the right direction:Firefighters led the survivors to safety.escort to go with somebody in order to protect or guard them or to show them the way:The president arrived, escorted by twelve bodyguards.drive to take somebody somewhere in a car, taxi, etc:My mother drove us to the airport.show to take somebody to a particular place, in the right direction, or along the correct route:The attendant showed us to our seats.walk to go somewhere with somebody on foot, especially in order to make sure that they get there safely; to take an animal, especially a dog, for a walk or make an animal walk somewhere:He always walked her home. Have you walked the dog yet today?guide to show somebody the way to a place, often by going with them; to show somebody a place that you know well:She guided us through the busy streets. We were guided around the museums.usher (rather formal) to politely take or show somebody where they should go, especially within a building:She ushered her guests to their seats.direct (rather formal) to tell or show somebody how to get somewhere or where to go:A young woman directed them to the station.Patterns to take/​lead/​escort/​drive/​show/​walk/​guide/​usher/​direct somebody to/​out of/​into something to take/​lead/​escort/​drive/​show/​walk/​guide somebody around/​round to take/​lead/​escort/​drive/​walk somebody home to take/​lead/​escort/​guide somebody to safety to lead/​show the way
  8. give order
  9. 5[transitive] (formal) to give an official order synonym order direct somebody to do something The police officers had been directed to search the building. direct that… The judge directed that the mother be given custody of the children. (British English also) The judge directed that the mother should be given custody of the children. Synonymsordertell instruct direct commandThese words all mean to use your position of authority to say to somebody that they must do something.order to use your position of authority to tell somebody to do something:The company was ordered to pay compensation to its former employee. ‘Come here at once!’ she ordered.tell to say to somebody that they must or should do something:He was told to sit down and wait. Don’t tell me what to do!instruct (rather formal) to tell somebody to do something, especially in a formal or official way:The letter instructed him to report to headquarters immediately.direct (formal) to give an official order:The judge directed the jury to return a verdict of not guilty.command to use your position of authority to tell somebody to do something:He commanded his men to retreat.order or command? Order is a more general word than command and can be used about anyone in a position of authority, such as a parent, teacher or government telling somebody to do something. Command is slightly stronger than order and is the normal word to use about an army officer giving orders, or in any context where it is normal to give orders without any discussion about them. It is less likely to be used about a parent or teacher.Patterns to order/​tell/​instruct/​direct/​command somebody to do something to order/​instruct/​direct/​command that… to do something as ordered/​told/​instructed/​directed/​commanded
  10. letter/comment
  11. 6[transitive] direct something to… (formal) to send a letter, etc. to a particular place or to a particular person Direct any complaints to the Customer Services department.
  12. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin directus, past participle of dirigere, from di- ‘distinctly’ or de- ‘down’ + regere ‘put straight’.Extra examples He directed the light straight in her face. He directs with flair and sensitivity. His anger was mostly directed towards/​toward Peter. I directed my question to the chairman. I found myself being directed into a dark room. It was directed by Luc Besson. Tax cuts have been directed primarily at the better-off. The attacks were directed solely at military targets. The film is expertly directed and beautifully photographed. The machine directs light onto a special film. This merely directs attention away from the real issues. We are directing our efforts towards helping young people. a detour that directs you through narrow, dimly lit streets anger directed specifically against ethnic minorities criticism clearly directed at the Labour Party criticism clearly directed at upper management A young woman directed them to the station. He was asked to take command and direct operations. The campaign was carefully directed from party central office. The criticisms were clearly directed at the President. The judge directed that the mother be given custody of the children. The judge directed the jury to return a verdict of not guilty. The law will come into force next year, as directed by the federal government. There are three main issues we need to direct our attention to. You should be prepared to carry out all reasonable duties as directed by the principal.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: direct