Definition of discipline verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    discipline

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈdɪsəplɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɪsəplɪn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they discipline
    BrE BrE//ˈdɪsəplɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɪsəplɪn//
     
    he / she / it disciplines
    BrE BrE//ˈdɪsəplɪnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɪsəplɪnz//
     
    past simple disciplined
    BrE BrE//ˈdɪsəplɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɪsəplɪnd//
     
    past participle disciplined
    BrE BrE//ˈdɪsəplɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɪsəplɪnd//
     
    -ing form disciplining
    BrE BrE//ˈdɪsəplɪnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdɪsəplɪnɪŋ//
     
    Raising children, School life
     
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  1. 1discipline somebody (for something) to punish somebody for something they have done The officers were disciplined for using racist language. See related entries: School life
  2. 2discipline somebody to train somebody, especially a child, to obey particular rules and control the way they behave a guide to the best ways of disciplining your child See related entries: Raising children
  3. 3to control the way you behave and make yourself do things that you believe you should do discipline yourself Dieting is a matter of disciplining yourself. discipline yourself to do something He disciplined himself to exercise at least three times a week.
  4. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘mortification by punishing oneself’): via Old French from Latin disciplina ‘instruction, knowledge’, from discipulus ‘learner’, from discere ‘learn’.Extra examples Several players had to be disciplined for violent behaviour. a highly disciplined approach to work A spokesman confirmed that Lewis will be disciplined by the club for his outburst. Should unions discipline members who take unofficial action?
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: discipline

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