English

Definition of disgust noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

disgust

 noun
noun
BrE BrE//dɪsˈɡʌst//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈɡʌst//
 
Disgust
 
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 [uncountable] a strong feeling of dislike or disapproval for somebody/something that you feel is unacceptable, or for something that looks, smells, etc. unpleasant disgust (at/with something) She expressed her disgust at the programme by writing a letter of complaint. disgust (for somebody) I can only feel disgust for these criminals. The idea fills me with disgust. He walked away in disgust. Much to my disgust, they refused to help. She wrinkled her nose in disgust at the smell. See related entries: Disgust Word Origin late 16th cent.: from early modern French desgoust or Italian disgusto, from Latin dis- (expressing reversal) + gustus ‘taste’.Extra examples He gave a snort of disgust. He threw her one look, then turned away in disgust. I couldn’t find the words to express my disgust at his actions. Marion threw down the book in disgust. Mr Haynes shook his head in obvious disgust and walked off. Much to his disgust, he found himself sharing a carriage with a noisy young family. People are showing their disgust with the existing regime. She tried to hide the disgust that she felt. They both looked with disgust at the men. expressions of public disgust over the affair He walked away in disgust. Much to my disgust they refused to help. She expressed her disgust at the show by writing a letter to complain. She wrinkled her nose in disgust at the smell or urine.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: disgust

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