Definition of disrupt verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

disrupt

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//dɪsˈrʌpt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈrʌpt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they disrupt
BrE BrE//dɪsˈrʌpt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈrʌpt//
 
he / she / it disrupts
BrE BrE//dɪsˈrʌpts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈrʌpts//
 
past simple disrupted
BrE BrE//dɪsˈrʌptɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈrʌptɪd//
 
past participle disrupted
BrE BrE//dɪsˈrʌptɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈrʌptɪd//
 
-ing form disrupting
BrE BrE//dɪsˈrʌptɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//dɪsˈrʌptɪŋ//
 
 
jump to other results
disrupt something to make it difficult for something to continue in the normal way Demonstrators succeeded in disrupting the meeting. Bus services will be disrupted tomorrow because of the bridge closure. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin disrupt- ‘broken apart’, from the verb disrumpere.Extra examples The bad weather has seriously disrupted supplies of food. They warned that climate change could potentially disrupt economic activity. I’m not going to let him disrupt my life any longer. Public transport services are likely to be severely disrupted tomorrow. The award ceremony was completely disrupted by a technicians’ strike. The refusal of the US to participate threatened to disrupt the negotiations.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: disrupt