English

Definition of do auxiliary verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    do1

     auxiliary verb
    auxiliary verb
    BrE BrE////
     
    ; NAmE NAmE////
     
    ; BrE BrE//du//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//du//
     
    ; BrE strong form BrE//duː//
     
    ; NAmE strong form NAmE//duː//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they do
    BrE BrE//duː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//duː//
     
    do notdon't he / she / it does
    BrE BrE//dʌz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dʌz//
     
    does notdoesn't past simple did
    BrE BrE//dɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dɪd//
     
    did notdidn't past participle done
    BrE BrE//dʌn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dʌn//
     
    -ing form doing
    BrE BrE//ˈduːɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈduːɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  used before a full verb to form negative sentences and questions I don't like fish. They didn't go to Paris. Don't forget to write. Does she speak French?
  2. 2  used to make question tags (= short questions at the end of statements) You live in New York, don't you? She doesn't work here, does she?
  3. 3  used to avoid repeating a full verb He plays better than he did a year ago. She works harder than he does. ‘Who won?’ ‘I did.’ ‘I love peaches.’ ‘So do I.’ ‘I don't want to go back.’ ‘Neither do I.’
  4. 4used when no other auxiliary verb is present, to emphasize what you are saying He does look tired. She did at least write to say thank you. (British English) Do shut up!
  5. 5used to change the order of the subject and verb when an adverb is moved to the front Not only does she speak Spanish, she's also good with computers.
  6. Word Origin Old English dōn, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch doen and German tun, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek tithēmi ‘I place’ and Latin facere ‘make, do’. Word Origin Old English dōn, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch doen and German tun, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek tithēmi ‘I place’ and Latin facere ‘make, do’.Extra examples Both mother and baby are doing well. Do as you’re told! Do whatever you like. Does this pub do lunches? Have you done any Keats? He did a beautiful drawing of a house. He doesn’t smoke, drink or do drugs. He’s doing very well at school. How many miles did you do yesterday? I can’t do this sum. I like listening to the radio when I’m doing the ironing. I like the way you’ve done your hair. I’ll do a copy for you. I’m doing physics, chemistry and biology. I’m doing some research on the subject. Just do what they tell you to do. Let’s do lunch. My car does 40 miles to the gallon. She did well out of the deal. Sorry. I don’t do funny There’s nothing to do in this place. There’s nothing we can do about it. We did the round trip in under three hours. What can I do for you? What did she do for a living? Who’s doing the flowers for the wedding? You could help me by doing the dishes.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: do