English

Definition of drown verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    drown

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//draʊn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//draʊn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they drown
    BrE BrE//draʊn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//draʊn//
     
    he / she / it drowns
    BrE BrE//draʊnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//draʊnz//
     
    past simple drowned
    BrE BrE//draʊnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//draʊnd//
     
    past participle drowned
    BrE BrE//draʊnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//draʊnd//
     
    -ing form drowning
    BrE BrE//ˈdraʊnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdraʊnɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to die because you have been underwater too long and you cannot breathe; to kill somebody in this way Two children drowned after falling into the river. He had attempted to rescue the drowning man. drown somebody/something/yourself She tried to drown herself. He was drowned at sea. They had drowned the unwanted kittens.
  2. 2[transitive] drown something (in something) to make something very wet; to completely cover something in water or another liquid synonym drench The fruit was drowned in cream.
  3. 3[transitive] drown somebody/something (out) (of a sound) to be louder than other sounds so that you cannot hear them She turned up the radio to drown out the noise from next door.
  4. Word Origin Middle English (originally northern): related to Old Norse drukkna ‘to be drowned’, also to drink.Extra examples He had tried to drown himself. His words were drowned out by jeers and whistling. She fell into the river and nearly drowned. She had been thrown into the harbour and left to drown. They were commended for saving a four-year-old from drowning.Idioms
    drown your fears/loneliness/sorrows, etc.
     
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    (especially humorous) to get drunk in order to forget your problems
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: drown