English

Definition of enclose verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    enclose

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkləʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkloʊz//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they enclose
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkləʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkloʊz//
     
    he / she / it encloses
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkləʊzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkloʊzɪz//
     
    past simple enclosed
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkləʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkloʊzd//
     
    past participle enclosed
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkləʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkloʊzd//
     
    -ing form enclosing
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkləʊzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkloʊzɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[usually passive] enclose something (in/with something) to build a wall, fence, etc. around something The yard had been enclosed with iron railings. The land was enclosed in the seventeenth century (= in Britain, when public land was made private property). (figurative) All translated words should be enclosed in brackets.
  2. 2enclose something (especially of a wall, fence, etc.) to surround something Low hedges enclosed the flower beds. (figurative) She felt his arms enclose her.
  3. 3enclose something (with something) to put something in the same envelope, package, etc. as something else Please return the completed form, enclosing a recent photograph.
  4. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘shut in, imprison’): from Old French enclos, past participle of enclore, based on Latin includere ‘shut in’.Extra examples The non-smoking section was completely enclosed in glass. The ring is enclosed in a plastic case. I can’t stand being shut in a small enclosed space. The garden was enclosed by a tall, black wooden fence. The land was enclosed in the seventeenth century.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: enclose