English

Definition of encroach verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    encroach

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkrəʊtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkroʊtʃ//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they encroach
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkrəʊtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkroʊtʃ//
     
    he / she / it encroaches
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkrəʊtʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkroʊtʃɪz//
     
    past simple encroached
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkrəʊtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkroʊtʃt//
     
    past participle encroached
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkrəʊtʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkroʊtʃt//
     
    -ing form encroaching
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈkrəʊtʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈkroʊtʃɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] encroach (on/upon something) (disapproving) to begin to affect or use up too much of somebody’s time, rights, personal life, etc. I won't encroach on your time any longer. He never allows work to encroach upon his family life. Gradually the negative feelings encroached into her work.
  2. 2[intransitive] encroach (on/upon something) to slowly begin to cover more and more of an area The growing town soon encroached on the surrounding countryside. the encroaching tide (= that is coming in)
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘obtain unlawfully, seize’; formerly also as incroach): from Old French encrochier ‘seize, fasten upon’, from en- ‘in, on’ + crochier (from croc ‘hook’, from Old Norse krókr).
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: encroach