English

Definition of end noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    end

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//end//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//end//
     
    Elements of a story
     
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    final part
  1. 1  the final part of a period of time, an event, an activity or a story at the end of the week We didn't leave until the very end. the end of the book We had to hear about the whole journey from beginning to end. It's the end of an era. Our end-of-season sale starts next week. There’ll be a chance to ask questions at the end. See related entries: Elements of a story
  2. furthest part
  3. 2  the part of an object or a place that is the furthest away from its centre Turn right at the end of the road. His office is the room at the other end of the corridor. I joined the end of the queue. Go to the end of the line! You've got something on the end of your nose. Tie the ends of the string together. That's his wife sitting at the far end of the table. These two products are from opposite ends of the price range. We've travelled from one end of Mexico to the other. They live in the end house. see also big end, dead end, East End, split end, tail end
  4. finish
  5. 3  a situation in which something does not exist any more the end of all his dreams The meeting came to an end (= finished). The war was finally at an end. The coup brought his corrupt regime to an end. There's no end in sight to the present crisis. They have called for an end to violence. This latest attack could spell the end of the peace process. Let’s put an end to(= stop) these rumours once and for all. That was by no means the end of the matter.
  6. aim
  7. 4an aim or a purpose They are prepared to use violence in pursuit of their ends. She is exploiting the current situation for her own ends. He joined the society for political ends. With this end in view (= in order to achieve this) they employed 50 new staff. We are willing to make any concessions necessary to this end (= in order to achieve this). They are working towards common ends. Synonymstargetobjective goal object endThese are all words for something that you are trying to achieve.target a result that you try to achieve:Set yourself targets that you can reasonably hope to achieve. attainment targets in schoolsobjective (rather formal) something that you are trying to achieve:What is the main objective of this project?goal something that you hope to achieve:He continued to pursue his goal of becoming an actor.target, objective or goal?A target is usually officially recorded in some way, for example by an employer or by a government committee. It is often specific, and in the form of figures, such as number of sales or exam passes, or a date. People often set their own objectives: these are things that they wish to achieve, often as part of a project or a talk they are giving. Goals are often long-term, and relate to people’s life and career plans or the long-term plans of a company or organization.object the purpose of something; something that you plan to achieve:The object is to educate people about road safety.end something that you plan to achieve:He joined the society for political ends. That’s only OK if you believe that the end justifies the means(= bad methods of doing something are acceptable if the final result is good). End is usually used in the plural or in particular fixed expressions.Patterns to work towards a(n) target/​objective/​goal an ambitious/​major/​long-term/​short-term/​future target/​objective/​goal economic/​financial/​business targets/​objectives/​goals to set/​agree on/​identify/​reach/​meet/​exceed a(n) target/​objective/​goal to achieve a(n) target/​objective/​goal/​end
  8. part of activity
  9. 5[usually singular] a part of an activity with which somebody is concerned, especially in business We need somebody to handle the marketing end of the business. Are there any problems at your end? I have kept my end of the bargain.
  10. of telephone line/journey
  11. 6[usually singular] either of two places connected by a telephone call, journey, etc. I answered the phone but there was no one at the other end. Jean is going to meet me at the other end.
  12. of sports field
  13. 7one of the two halves of a sports field The teams changed ends at half-time.
  14. piece left
  15. 8(British English) a small piece that is left after something has been used a cigarette end see also fag end, loose end, odds and ends
  16. death
  17. 9[usually singular] a person’s death. People say end to avoid saying death. She came to an untimely end (= died young). I was with him at the end (= when he died). (literary) He met his end (= died) at the Battle of Waterloo.
  18. Word Origin Old English ende (noun), endian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch einde (noun), einden (verb) and German Ende (noun), enden (verb).Extra examples Continue until you reach the end of the road. Despite our differences, we were working to a common end. For her, shopping had become an end in itself. For her, travelling had become an end in itself rather than a means of seeing new places. He defended a morality in which the end justifies the means. He met his end at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. He wants the reports by the end of the month. He was bound to meet a violent end one day. He won’t win, but he’ll keep fighting to the end. Her death marks the end of an era. His story was one big lie from beginning to end. I don’t enjoy studying computing—it’s just a means to an end. I just caught the tail end of the movie. I was getting bored towards the end of the talk. I’ll never get to the end of this book! I’m staying until the end of this week. In the end, they decided to spend Christmas at home. It stayed hot right up to the end of September. It wasn’t the end of their marriage, but it was the beginning of the end. She was prepared to lie in order to achieve her ends. She wished to have a house built, and to this end she engaged a local architect. Stand it on end. Take the free end of the rope and pass it through the hole. Talks were in progress to bring an end to the fighting. The author tied up all the loose ends of the story in the final chapter. The award was a fitting end to a distinguished career. The bank is right at the end of the street. The car was lifted up by the winds and tumbled end over end along the ground. The company believes in throwing new employees in at the deep end with no training. The end came when he collapsed after playing golf. The famous Las Vegas Strip is about three miles from end to end. The film’s backers were delighted with the end product. The injury brought her career to an early end. The loss of this contract could signal the end of the line for the shipyard. The meeting finally came to an end at six. The money might have been used to more beneficial ends. The proceedings are expected to be at an end by 6 p.m. The rope was unfastened at one end. The teams changed ends at half time. The two parties represent opposite ends of the political spectrum. They get married at the end of the movie. Tie both ends of the string together. Turn into Hope Street and our house is right at the end. We tried cutting through a back road but it was a dead end. We walked along the whole promenade, from end to end. We will fight this case to the bitter end. What the business community wants is an end to the recession. You don’t know who the murderer is until right at the end of the book. You should have your hair trimmed every few weeks to get rid of split ends. a dead-end job call for an end to the violence housebuyers at the cheap end of the market the southern end of the lake to come to a sticky end to come to a sticky= unpleasant, but deserved end I hope to finish this by the end of the week. It was the end of all his dreams. Let’s put an end to these rumours once and for all. Stand the box on end. That’s only OK if you believe that the end justifies the means. The coup brought his corrupt regime to an end. The meeting came to an end. There’ll be a chance to ask questions at the end. They finally get named at the end of the book. We are willing to make any concessions necessary to this end. We had to hear about the whole journey from beginning to end. We need someone to handle the marketing end of the business. We’ve travelled from one end of Mexico to the other. With this end in view they employed 50 new sales reps. You’ve got something on the end of your nose.Idioms (informal) used to introduce the most important fact after everything has been considered At the end of the day, he'll still have to make his own decision.
    at a loose end (British English) (usually North American English at loose ends)
     
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    having nothing to do and not knowing what you want to do Come and see us, if you're at a loose end.
    (British English) something unpleasant that happens to somebody, for example punishment or a violent death, usually because of their own actions He'll come to a sticky end one of these days if he carries on like that.
    be at the end of something
     
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    to have almost nothing left of something I'm at the end of my patience. They are at the end of their food supply.
    be at the end of your tether (British English) (North American English be at the end of your rope)
     
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    to feel that you cannot deal with a difficult situation any more because you are too tired, worried, etc. You’d better let her know you’re safe. She’s at the end of her tether.
    be at/on the receiving end (of something)
     
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    (informal) to be the person that an action, etc. is directed at, especially an unpleasant one She found herself on the receiving end of a great deal of criticism.
    to be so worried by a problem that you do not know what to do next She was at her wits’ end wondering how she’d manage it all in the time. See related entries: Fear (British English, informal) when you say that people or situations are the end, you mean that you are annoyed with them
    the beginning of the end
     
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    the first sign of something ending The scandal was the beginning of the end of his career as a politician.
    burn the candle at both ends
     
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    to become very tired by trying to do too many things and going to bed late and getting up early
    a thing that is itself important and not just a part of something more important
    the end justifies the means
     
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    (saying) bad or unfair methods of doing something are acceptable if the result of that action is good or positive
    (reach) the end of the line/road
     
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    (to reach) the point at which something can no longer continue in the same way A defeat in the second round marked the end of the line for last year's champion.
    end of story (informal) (British English also end of…)
     
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    used when you are stating that there is nothing more that can be said or done about something If she doesn’t agree, I won’t go ahead. End of story.
    in a line, with the ends touching They arranged the tables end to end. (British English, slang) to have sex
    get the short end of the stick (North American English) (British English draw the short straw)
     
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    to be the person in a group who is chosen or forced to perform an unpleasant duty or task
    get (hold of) the wrong end of the stick
     
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    (British English, informal) to understand something in the wrong way
    (informal) to suddenly become very angry or emotional
    go to the ends of the earth
     
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    to do everything possible, even if it is difficult, in order to get or achieve something I'd go to the ends of the earth to see her again.
    1. 1  after a long period of time or series of events He tried various jobs and in the end became an accountant.
    2. 2  after everything has been considered You can try your best to impress the interviewers but in the end it's often just a question of luck.
    jump/be thrown in at the deep end
     
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    (informal) to start or be made to start a new and difficult activity that you are not prepared for Junior hospital doctors are thrown in at the deep end in their first jobs.
    (British English, informal) to continue to be cheerful in a difficult situation
    light at the end of the tunnel
     
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    something that shows you are nearly at the end of a long and difficult time or situation
    to earn just enough money to be able to buy the things you need Many families struggle to make ends meet.
    make somebody’s hair stand on end
     
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    to shock or frighten somebody a chilling tale that will make your hair stand on end
    a thing or action that is not interesting or important in itself but is a way of achieving something else He doesn't particularly like the work but he sees it as a means to an end. (informal) very much It upset me no end to hear they'd split up. (informal) a lot of something We had no end of trouble getting them to agree.
    not the end of the world
     
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    (informal) not the worst thing that could happen to somebody Failing one exam is not the end of the world.
    not/never hear the end of it
     
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    to keep being reminded of something because somebody is always talking to you about it If we don't get her a dog we'll never hear the end of it.
    1. 1in a vertical position It'll fit if you stand it on end.
    2. 2for the stated length of time, without stopping He would disappear for weeks on end.
    put an end to yourself, put an end to it all
     
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    to kill yourself
    the rough end of the pineapple
     
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    (Australian English, informal) a situation in which somebody is treated badly or unfairly
    the sharp end (of something)
     
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    (British English, informal) the place or position of greatest difficulty or responsibility He started work at the sharp end of the business, as a salesman.
    the thin end of the wedge
     
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    (especially British English) an event or action that is the beginning of something more serious and/or unpleasant The introduction of a tax on workplace parking is seen by many as the thin end of the wedge.
    to/until the bitter end
     
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    continuing until you have done everything you can, or until something is completely finished, despite difficulties and problems They were prepared to fight to the bitter end for their rights.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: end