Definition of endorse verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    endorse

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdɔːs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈdɔːrs//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they endorse
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdɔːs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈdɔːrs//
     
    he / she / it endorses
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdɔːsɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈdɔːrsɪz//
     
    past simple endorsed
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdɔːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈdɔːrst//
     
    past participle endorsed
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdɔːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈdɔːrst//
     
    -ing form endorsing
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdɔːsɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈdɔːrsɪŋ//
     
    Marketing
     
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  1. 1endorse something to say publicly that you support a person, statement or course of action I wholeheartedly endorse his remarks. Members of all parties endorsed a ban on land mines.
  2. 2endorse something to say in an advertisement that you use and like a particular product so that other people will want to buy it I wonder how many celebrities actually use the products they endorse. See related entries: Marketing
  3. 3endorse something to write your name on the back of a cheque so that it can be paid into a bank account
  4. 4[usually passive] endorse something (British English) to record details of a driving offence on somebody’s driving licence You risk having your licence endorsed.
  5. Word Origin late 15th cent. (in the sense ‘write on the back of’; formerly also as indorse): from medieval Latin indorsare, from Latin in- ‘in, on’ + dorsum ‘back’.Extra examples The government has broadly endorsed the research paper. The newspaper has formally endorsed the Democratic candidate. The plan does not explicitly endorse the private ownership of land.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: endorse