English

Definition of erupt verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    erupt

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪˈrʌpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪˈrʌpt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they erupt
    BrE BrE//ɪˈrʌpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪˈrʌpt//
     
    he / she / it erupts
    BrE BrE//ɪˈrʌpts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪˈrʌpts//
     
    past simple erupted
    BrE BrE//ɪˈrʌptɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪˈrʌptɪd//
     
    past participle erupted
    BrE BrE//ɪˈrʌptɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪˈrʌptɪd//
     
    -ing form erupting
    BrE BrE//ɪˈrʌptɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪˈrʌptɪŋ//
     
    Natural disasters
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] when a volcano erupts or burning rocks, smoke, etc. erupt or are erupted, the burning rocks, etc. are thrown out from the volcano The volcano could erupt at any time. erupt from something Ash began to erupt from the crater. erupt something An immense volume of rocks and molten lava was erupted. Synonymsexplodeblow up go off burst erupt detonateThese are all words that can be used when something bursts apart violently, causing damage or injury.explode to burst loudly and violently, causing damage; to make something burst in this way:The jet smashed into a hillside and exploded. The bomb was exploded under controlled conditions.blow (something) up to be destroyed by an explosion; to destroy something by an explosion:A police officer was killed when his car blew up.go off (of a bomb) to explode; (of a gun) to be fired:The bomb went off in a crowded street. When used about guns, the choice of go off (instead of ‘be fired’) can suggest that the gun was fired by accident.burst to break open or apart, especially because of pressure from inside; to make something break in this way:That balloon’s going to burst.erupt (of a volcano) to throw out burning rocks and smoke; (of burning rocks and smoke) to be thrown out of a volcano.detonate (rather formal) (of a bomb) to explode; to make a bomb explode:Two other bombs failed to detonate.Patterns a bomb explodes/​blows up/​goes off/​bursts/​detonates a car/​plane/​vehicle explodes/​blows up a firework/​rocket explodes/​goes off See related entries: Natural disasters
  2. 2[intransitive] to start happening, suddenly and violently synonym break out Violence erupted outside the embassy gates. erupt into something The unrest erupted into revolution.
  3. 3[intransitive, transitive] to suddenly express your feelings very strongly, especially by shouting loudly When Davis scored for the third time the crowd erupted. erupt in/into something My father just erupted into fury. + speech ‘How dare you?’ she erupted.
  4. 4[intransitive] (of spots, etc.) to suddenly appear on your skin A rash had erupted all over his chest.
  5. Word Origin mid 17th cent.: from Latin erupt- ‘broken out’, from the verb erumpere, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + rumpere ‘burst out, break’.Extra examples The violence threatened to erupt into full-scale war. Epidemics periodically erupted throughout the 19th century. His anger suddenly erupted into furious shouting. Michael finally erupted, jumping up from his seat. The audience spontaneously erupted into a standing ovation. The crowd erupted in cheers and sobs of joy. The room erupted with laughter. Violence occasionally erupts between the opposing factions. the volcano which erupted violently last month Lava erupted close to the summit.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: erupt