English

Definition of evident adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

evident

 adjective
adjective
BrE BrE//ˈevɪdənt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈevɪdənt//
 
 
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clear; easily seen synonym obvious The orchestra played with evident enjoyment. evident (to somebody) (that…) It has now become evident to us that a mistake has been made. evident in/from something The growing interest in history is clearly evident in the number of people visiting museums and country houses. Synonymsclearobvious apparent evident plainThese words all describe something that is easy to see or understand and leaves no doubts or confusion.clear easy to see or understand and leaving no doubts:It was quite clear to me that she was lying.obvious easy to see or understand:It’s obvious from what he said that something is wrong.apparent [not usually before noun] (rather formal) easy to see or understand:It was apparent from her face that she was really upset.evident (rather formal) easy to see or understand:The orchestra played with evident enjoyment.plain easy to see or understand:He made it very plain that he wanted us to leave. which word? These words all have almost exactly the same meaning. There are slight differences in register and patterns of use. If you make something clear/​plain, you do so deliberately because you want people to understand something; if you make something obvious, you usually do it without meaning to:I hope I make myself obvious. Try not to make it so clear/​plain. In the expressions clear majority, for obvious reasons, for no apparent reason and plain to see, none of the other words can be used instead. You can have a clear/​an obvious/​a plain case of something but not:an evident case of something.Patterns clear/​obvious/​apparent/​evident/​plain to somebody/​something clear/​obvious/​apparent/​evident/​plain that/​what/​who/​how/​where/​why… to seem/​become/​make something clear/​obvious/​apparent/​evident/​plain perfectly/​quite/​very clear/​obvious/​apparent/​evident/​plain see also self-evident Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin evidens, evident- ‘obvious to the eye or mind’, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + videre ‘to see’.Extra examples It is already evident that new roads only generate new traffic. It was evident to me that the mission would fail. It was fairly evident from her tone of voice that she disapproved. The commitment to local products is equally evident on the restaurant’s wine list. The silence of the forest was made evident by the occasional snap of a twig. The strain of her work schedule became painfully evident as she jetted from New York to London and on to Milan. The strain of her work schedule was becoming painfully evident. Their symptoms may be less evident to their caregivers. Those characteristics are abundantly evident in Webster’s essay. The growing interest in history is clearly evident in the number of people visiting museums.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: evident

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