Definition of fare verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

fare

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//feə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//fer//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they fare
BrE BrE//feə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//fer//
 
he / she / it fares
BrE BrE//feəz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ferz//
 
past simple fared
BrE BrE//feəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ferd//
 
past participle fared
BrE BrE//feəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ferd//
 
-ing form faring
BrE BrE//ˈfeərɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈferɪŋ//
 
 
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[intransitive] fare well, badly, better, etc. to be successful/unsuccessful in a particular situation synonym get on The party fared very badly in the last election. The North, by and large, has fared better than most regions in avoiding high unemployment figures. Word Origin Old English fær, faru ‘travelling, a journey or expedition’, faran ‘to travel’, also ‘get on (well or badly’), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch varen and German fahren ‘to travel’, Old Norse ferja ‘ferry boat’, also to ford. Senses 1 and 2 of the noun stem from an earlier meaning ‘a journey for which a price is paid’. Noun sense 3 was originally used with reference to the quality or quantity of food provided, probably from the idea of faring well or badly.Extra examples He fared well against his main rival. She should fare better in this competition. This movie fared poorly at the British box office.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fare

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