English

Definition of fine noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

fine

 noun
noun
BrE BrE//faɪn//
 
; NAmE NAmE//faɪn//
 
Types of punishment
 
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 a sum of money that must be paid as punishment for breaking a law or rule a parking fine Offenders will be liable to a heavy fine (= one that costs a lot of money). Under the new law, motorists face fines of up to £1 000. She has already paid over $2 000 in fines. Synonymsratecharge fee rent fine fare toll rentalThese are all words for an amount of money that is charged or paid for something.rate a fixed amount of money that is asked or paid for something:a low hourly rate of pay interest ratescharge an amount of money that is asked for goods or services:an admission chargefee (rather formal) an amount of money that you have to pay for professional advice or services, to go to a school or college, or to join an organization:legal fees an annual membership fee rent an amount of money that you regularly have to pay for use of a building or room. In American English, rent can be used to mean rental:The weekly rent on the car was over $300.fine a sum of money that must be paid as punishment for breaking a law or rule:a parking finefare the money that you pay to travel by bus, plane, taxi, etc.toll an amount of money that you have to pay to use a particular road or bridge.rental an amount of money that you have to pay to use something for a particular period of time.rent or rental?In British English rent is only money paid to use a building or room: for other items use rental. In American English rent can be used for both, but rental is still more common for other items.Patterns (a) rate/​charge/​fee/​rent/​fine/​fare/​toll/​rental for something (a) rate/​charge/​fee/​rent/​toll/​rental on something at a rate/​charge/​fee/​rent/​fare/​rental of… for a charge/​fee to pay (a) rate/​charge/​fee/​rent/​fine/​fare/​toll/​rental to charge (a) rate/​fee/​rent/​fare/​toll/​rental CollocationsCriminal justiceBreaking the law break/​violate/​obey/​uphold the law be investigated/​arrested/​tried for a crime/​a robbery/​fraud be arrested/ (especially North American English) indicted/​convicted on charges of rape/​fraud/(especially US English) felony charges be arrested on suspicion of arson/​robbery/​shoplifting be accused of/​be charged with murder/(especially North American English) homicide/​four counts of fraud face two charges of indecent assault admit your guilt/​liability/​responsibility (for something) deny the allegations/​claims/​charges confess to a crime grant/​be refused/​be released on/​skip/​jump bailThe legal process stand/​await/​bring somebody to/​come to/​be on trial take somebody to/​come to/​settle something out of court face/​avoid/​escape prosecution seek/​retain/​have the right to/​be denied access to legal counsel hold/​conduct/​attend/​adjourn a hearing/​trial sit on/​influence/​persuade/​convince the jury sit/​stand/​appear/​be put/​place somebody in the dock plead guilty/​not guilty to a crime be called to/​enter (British English) the witness box take/​put somebody on the stand/(North American English) the witness stand call/​subpoena/​question/​cross-examine a witness give/​hear the evidence against/​on behalf of somebody raise/​withdraw/​overrule an objection reach a unanimous/​majority verdict return/​deliver/​record a verdict of not guilty/​unlawful killing/​accidental death convict/​acquit the defendant of the crime secure a conviction/​your acquittal lodge/​file an appeal appeal (against)/challenge/​uphold/​overturn a conviction/​verdictSentencing and punishment pass sentence on somebody carry/​face/​serve a seven-year/​life sentence receive/​be given the death penalty be sentenced to ten years (in prison/​jail) carry/​impose/​pay a fine (of $3 000)/a penalty (of 14 years imprisonment) be imprisoned/​jailed for drug possession/​fraud/​murder do/​serve time/​ten years be sent to/​put somebody in/​be released from jail/​prison be/​put somebody/​spend X years on death row be granted/​be denied/​break (your) parole See related entries: Types of punishment Word Originnoun Middle English: from Old French fin ‘end, payment’, from Latin finis ‘end’ (in medieval Latin denoting a sum paid on settling a lawsuit). The original sense was ‘conclusion’ (surviving in the phrase in fine); also used in the medieval Latin sense, the word came to denote a penalty of any kind, later specifically a monetary penalty.Extra examples Drivers risk heavy fines for driving without a licence. He was forced to pay a hefty fine. Heavy fines were levied on motoring offenders. I got a fine for parking illegally. I got a parking fine for parking on double yellow lines. The club is struggling to pay £75 000 in fines to the football league. The offence carries a maximum fine of £500. They face up to five years in prison and more than $1 million in fines. Violations carry a maximum fine of $1 000. a fine for water pollution Offenders will be liable to a heavy fine.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fine