English

Definition of floor noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    floor

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//flɔː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//flɔːr//
     
    Parts of a house, Structures
     
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    of room
  1. 1  [countable, usually singular] the surface of a room that you walk on a wooden/concrete/marble, etc. floor ceramic floor tiles The body was lying on the kitchen floor. The furniture and floor coverings date from the 1920s. The alterations should give us extra floor space. Synonymsfloorground land earthThese are all words for the surface that you walk on.floor the surface of a room that you walk on:She was sitting on the floor watching TV.ground (often the ground) the solid surface of the earth that you walk on:I found her lying on the ground. The rocket crashed a few seconds after it left the ground.land the surface of the earth that is not sea:It was good to be back on dry land again. They fought both at sea and on land.earth (often the earth) the solid surface of the world that is made of rock, soil, sand, etc:You could feel the earth shake as the truck came closer.ground, land or earth? Ground is the normal word for the solid surface that you walk on when you are not in a building or vehicle. You can use earth if you want to draw attention to the rock, soil etc. that the ground is made of. Land is only used when you want to contrast it with the sea:the land beneath our feet feel the land shake sight ground/​earth travel by ground/​earthPatterns on/​under the floor/​ground/​earth bare floor/​ground/​earth to drop/​fall to the floor/​the ground/(the) earth to reach the floor/​the ground/​land Wordfinderballet, ballroom, band, choreograph, dance, floor, folk dance, music, partner, step See related entries: Parts of a house, Structures
  2. of vehicle
  3. 2(North American English also floorboard) [countable, usually singular] the bottom surface of a vehicle The floor of the car was covered in cigarette ends.
  4. level of building
  5. 3  [countable] all the rooms that are on the same level of a building Her office is on the second floor. the Irish guy who lives two floors above There is a lift to all floors. Their house is on three floors (= it has three floors). British/​Americanfloor In British English the floor of a building at street level is the ground floor, the one above it is the first floor and the one below it is the basement, or lower ground floor in a public building. In North American English the floor at street level is usually called the first floor, the one above it is the second floor and the one below it is the basement. In public buildings the floor at street level can also be called the ground floor. note at storey Which Word?storey / floor You use storey (British English)/story (North American English) mainly when you are talking about the number of levels a building has:a five-storey house The office building is five storeys high. Floor is used mainly to talk about which particular level in the building someone lives on, goes to, etc:His office is on the fifth floor. see also ground floor See related entries: Parts of a house, Structures
  6. of the sea/forests
  7. 4  [countable, usually singular] the ground at the bottom of the sea, a forest, etc. the ocean/valley/cave/forest floor
  8. in parliament, etc.
  9. 5the floor [singular] the part of a building where discussions or debates are held, especially in a parliament; the people who attend a discussion or debate Opposition politicians registered their protest on the floor of the House. We will now take any questions from the floor. Wordfinderargument, ayes, chair, debate, the floor, motion, propose, second, speak, vote
  10. area for work
  11. 6[countable, usually singular] an area in a building that is used for a particular activity on the floor of the Stock Exchange (= where trading takes place) see also dance floor, factory floor, shop floor, trading floor
  12. for wages/prices
  13. 7[countable, usually singular] the lowest level allowed for wages or prices Prices have gone through the floor (= fallen to a very low level). compare ceiling (2)
  14. Word Origin Old English flōr, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vloer and German Flur.Extra examples Do you mind sitting on the floor? His glass fell to the floor and broke. I can’t sleep on the bare floor! The offices occupy the top floor of the building. a cafe on the mezzanine floor Her office is on the second floor. His footsteps echoed on the wooden floor. She was sitting on the floor watching TV. The bathroom floor was flooded with water. The vase fell to the floor with a crash. Their house is on three floors. There is a lift/​an elevator to all floors. There were wooden panels from floor to ceiling. There’s not really enough floor space in here. to clean/​wash/​sweep the floorIdioms
    be/get in on the ground floor
     
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    to become involved in a plan, project, etc. at the beginning See related entries: Parts of a house
    get/be given/have the floor
     
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    to get/be given/have the right to speak during a discussion or debate
    to speak during a discussion or debate, especially for a long time so that nobody else is able to say anything She held the floor for over an hour. to start dancing on a dance floor Couples took the floor for the last dance of the evening.
    wipe/mop the floor with somebody
     
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    (informal) to defeat somebody completely in an argument or a competition
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: floor