English

Definition of focus noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    focus

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈfəʊkəs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfoʊkəs//
     
    (pl. focuses, foci
    BrE BrE//ˈfəʊsaɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfoʊsaɪ//
     
    )
    Natural disasters
     
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  1. 1  [uncountable, countable, usually singular] the thing or person that people are most interested in; the act of paying special attention to something and making people interested in it It was the main focus of attention at the meeting. focus for something His comments provided a focus for debate. focus on something We shall maintain our focus on the needs of the customer. In today's lecture the focus will be on tax structures within the European Union. The incident brought the problem of violence in schools into sharp focus. What we need now is a change of focus (= to look at things in a different way).
  2. 2  [uncountable] a point or distance at which the outline of an object is clearly seen by the eye or through a lens The children's faces are badly out of focus (= not clearly shown) in the photograph. The binoculars were not in focus (= were not showing things clearly).
  3. 3 (also focal point) [countable] (physics) a point at which waves of light, sound, etc. meet after reflection or refraction; the point from which waves of light, sound, etc. seem to come
  4. 4 [countable] (geology) the point at which an earthquake starts to happen See related entries: Natural disasters
  5. Word Origin mid 17th cent. (as a term in geometry and physics): from Latin, literally ‘domestic hearth’.Extra examples Cities have always acted as the principal focus of political life. He found he was now their main focus of attention. I found the focus of the debate too narrow. I’ve directed my focus towards/​toward developing my skills. Our primary focus this term will be on group work. She became a focus for all his anger. The binoculars were not in focus. The children’s faces are badly out of focus in the photograph. The company’s restructuring is designed to give a sharper focus on key growth markets. The focus has now shifted towards the problem of long-term unemployment. The legal team tried to shift the focus onto the victim. The media focus has now shifted onto something else. The problem with your plan is that it doesn’t have a clear focus. The question of compensation comes into focus. The restructuring is designed to give a sharper focus on key markets. This case has brought the problem of drug abuse in schools into sharp focus. When I got glasses suddenly the whole world came into focus. an increased focus on younger people soft focus shots of cuddly animals the focus of my research In today’s lecture the focus will be on tax structures within the European Union. What we need now is a change of focus.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: focus