Definition of fortune noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    fortune

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈfɔːtʃuːn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfɔːrtʃən//
     
     
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  1. 1  [uncountable] chance or luck, especially in the way it affects people’s lives I have had the good fortune to work with some brilliant directors. By a stroke of fortune he found work almost immediately. Fortune smiled on me (= I had good luck). Wordfinderamulet, charm, coincidence, fate, fortune, jinx, luck, mascot, superstition, talisman
  2. 2  [countable] a large amount of money He made a fortune in real estate. She inherited a share of the family fortune. A car like that costs a small fortune. You don't have to spend a fortune to give your family tasty, healthy meals. She is hoping her US debut will be the first step on the road to fame and fortune. That ring must be worth a fortune.
  3. 3  [countable, usually plural, uncountable] the good and bad things that happen to a person, family, country, etc. the changing fortunes of the film industry the fortunes of war a reversal of fortune(s)
  4. 4[countable] a person’s fate or future She can tell your fortune by looking at the lines on your hand.
  5. see also soldier of fortune
    Word Origin Middle English: via Old French from Latin Fortuna, the name of a goddess personifying luck or chance.Extra examples A horseshoe nailed to your door is supposed to bring good fortune. All we can do is hope for a change in fortune. As good fortune would have it, a bus came along just when I needed it. By a stroke of good fortune, Steven was still in his office. For once, fortune was on our side: the weather improved in time for the game. Fortune smiled on me that day. He built his fortune from breeding horses. He has amassed a considerable fortune out of trading shares. He lost his fortune in the crash of 1929. He was sole heir to the family fortune. Her aunt died and left her a fortune. I had the good fortune to work with people I liked. Rebuilding the house must have cost a small fortune. She made a fortune in the property boom. She spends a fortune on clothes! She squandered the family fortune. Some of those old toys are worth a fortune now. The company suffered a great reversal of fortunes when public taste changed. The party still hopes to revive its flagging electoral fortunes. They sold their house at the right time and made a fortune on it. They went to America in search of fame and fortune. They went to have their fortunes read. They went to seek their fortune abroad. They went to seek their fortune in the city. a year of mixed fortunes for the company as the country’s fortunes rose and fell fans who follow the fortunes of their chosen team A car like that costs a small fortune. By a stroke of fortune he found work almost immediately. She is hoping her US debut will be the first step on the road to fame and fortune. That ring must be worth a fortune. The fortune teller said she could tell my fortune by looking at the lines on my hand. The share price tends to follow the changing fortunes of the film industry. The team had a dramatic reversal of fortune in the second half. You don’t have to spend a fortune to give your family tasty, healthy meals.Idioms something that you have, or have promised to do, that could cause trouble or worry in the future (literary) to try to find a way to become rich, especially by going to another place Many emigrated to Australia to seek their fortune.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fortune