Definition of foul verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    foul

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//faʊl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//faʊl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they foul
    BrE BrE//faʊl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//faʊl//
     
    he / she / it fouls
    BrE BrE//faʊlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//faʊlz//
     
    past simple fouled
    BrE BrE//faʊld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//faʊld//
     
    past participle fouled
    BrE BrE//faʊld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//faʊld//
     
    -ing form fouling
    BrE BrE//ˈfaʊlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈfaʊlɪŋ//
     
    Baseball, Soccer, Basketball
     
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  1. 1[transitive] foul somebody (in sport) to do something to another player that is against the rules of the game He was fouled inside the penalty area. See related entries: Soccer, Basketball
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] foul (something) (in baseball) to hit the ball outside the playing area See related entries: Baseball
  3. 3[transitive] foul something to make something dirty, especially with waste matter from the body Do not permit your dog to foul the grass. More and more beaches are being fouled by oil leakages.
  4. 4[transitive, intransitive] to become caught or twisted in something and stop it working or moving foul something (up) The rope fouled the propeller. The line became fouled in (= became twisted in) the propeller. foul (up) A rope fouled up (= became twisted) as we pulled the sail down.
  5. Word Origin Old English fūl, of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse fúll ‘foul’, Dutch vuil ‘dirty’, and German faul ‘rotten, lazy’, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin pus, Greek puos ‘pus’, and Latin putere ‘to stink’. Phrasal Verbsfoul upfoul somethingup
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: foul