Definition of full adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    full

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//fʊl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//fʊl//
     
    (fuller, fullest)
     
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    with no empty space
  1. 1  full (of something) containing or holding as much or as many as possible; having no empty space a full bottle of wine She could only nod, because her mouth was full. My suitcase was full of books. There were cardboard boxes stuffed full of clothes. (British English) Sorry, the hotel is full up tonight.
  2. having a lot
  3. 2  full of something having or containing a large number or amount of something The sky was full of brightly coloured fireworks. Life is full of coincidences. Our new brochure is crammed full of inspirational ideas. animals pumped full of antibiotics She was full of admiration for the care she had received. He smiled, his eyes full of laughter.
  4. talking a lot
  5. 3full of something (of a person) thinking or talking a lot about a particular thing He was full of his new job and everything he'd been doing.
  6. with food
  7. 4  (British English also full up) having had enough to eat No more for me, thanks—I'm full up. The kids still weren't full, so I gave them an ice cream each. You can't run on a full stomach.
  8. complete
  9. 5  [usually before noun] complete; with nothing missing Full details are available on request. I still don't think we've heard the full story. a full English breakfast A full refund will be given if the item is faulty. Fill in your full name and address. The country applied for full membership of the European Union. It is too early to assess the full extent of the damage. They sell a full range of hair and beauty products.
  10. as much as possible
  11. 6  [usually before noun] to the highest level or greatest amount possible synonym maximum Many people don't use their computers to their full potential. measures to achieve full employment Students should take full advantage of the university's facilities. She came round the corner at full speed.
  12. busy
  13. 7  busy; involving a lot of activities He'd had a very full life. Her life was too full to find time for hobbies.
  14. for emphasis
  15. 8[only before noun] used to emphasize an amount or a quantity She is a full four inches shorter than her sister.
  16. moon
  17. 9appearing as a complete circle The moon was full, the sky clear. see also full moon
  18. fat
  19. 10(of a person or part of the body) large and round. Full is sometimes used to avoid saying ‘fat’. He kissed her full sensual lips. They specialize in clothes for women with a fuller figure.
  20. clothes
  21. 11made with plenty of cloth; fitting loosely a full skirt
  22. tone/voice/flavour
  23. 12deep, strong and rich He draws a unique full sound from the instrument. the full fruity flavour of the wine
  24. Word Origin Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vol and German voll.Extra examples Her wine glass was still fairly full. I’m full up. I can’t eat another thing. The bottle was half full of mineral water. The garage has got full of junk again. The kitchen was absolutely full of flies! The reservoirs are all virtually full. He’d had a very full life. I ordered a full English breakfast. I still don’t think we’ve heard the full story. I’ve always believed in living life to the full. Life is full of coincidences. Many people don’t use their computers to their full potential. No more for me, thanks—I’m full up. Our new brochure is crammed full of inspirational ideas. She came round the corner at full speed. Students should take full advantage of the college’s facilities. The kids still weren’t full, so I gave them an ice cream each. You shouldn’t swim on a full stomach. measures to achieve full employmentIdioms Most idioms containing full are at the entries for the nouns and verbs in the idioms, for example full of the joys of spring is at joy.  (informal, disapproving) (of a person) not telling the truth; tending to exaggerate things ‘You are so full of it!’ she retorted furiously. (disapproving) very proud; thinking only of yourself See related entries: Proud  including the whole of something The address must be printed in full.
    to the full(usually North American English to the fullest)
     
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    to the greatest possible degree I've always believed in living life to the full.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: full