English

Definition of fund verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

    

fund

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//fʌnd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//fʌnd//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they fund
BrE BrE//fʌnd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//fʌnd//
 
he / she / it funds
BrE BrE//fʌndz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//fʌndz//
 
past simple funded
BrE BrE//ˈfʌndɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌndɪd//
 
past participle funded
BrE BrE//ˈfʌndɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌndɪd//
 
-ing form funding
BrE BrE//ˈfʌndɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈfʌndɪŋ//
 
Running a business
 
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 fund something to provide money for something, usually something official a dance festival funded by the Arts Council The museum is privately funded. a government-funded programme See related entries: Running a business Word Origin mid 17th cent.: from Latin fundus ‘bottom, piece of landed property’. The earliest sense was ‘the bottom or lowest part’, later ‘foundation or basis’; the association with money has perhaps arisen from the idea of landed property being a source of wealth.Extra examples Infrastructure projects are centrally funded. The GDPC is not directly funded by the taxpayer. The museum is funded solely from voluntary contributions. The school opted out of local authority control and is funded directly by the government. The venture is funded entirely by its board of directors. This money will help to fund administration costs. a new, fully funded training scheme a plan jointly funded by central and local government fully funded day care for our children Drug companies and the government will jointly fund the necessary medical research. It’s a government-funded programme for young offenders. She used the stolen money to fund her extravagant lifestyle. There is an annual dance festival funded by the Arts Council.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: fund