English

Definition of halt verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

halt

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//hɔːlt//
 
, also BrE//hɒlt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hɔːlt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they halt
BrE BrE//hɔːlt//
 
, also BrE//hɒlt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hɔːlt//
 
he / she / it halts
BrE BrE//hɔːlts//
 
, BrE//hɒlts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hɔːlts//
 
past simple halted
BrE BrE//ˈhɔːltɪd//
 
, BrE//ˈhɒltɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɔːltɪd//
 
past participle halted
BrE BrE//ˈhɔːltɪd//
 
, BrE//ˈhɒltɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɔːltɪd//
 
-ing form halting
BrE BrE//ˈhɔːltɪŋ//
 
, BrE//ˈhɒltɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɔːltɪŋ//
 
 
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  • [intransitive, transitive] to stop; to make somebody/something stop She walked towards him and then halted. ‘Halt!’ the Major ordered (= used as a command to soldiers). halt somebody/something The police were halting traffic on the parade route. The trial was halted after the first week.
  • Word Origin late 16th cent.: originally in the phrase make halt, from German haltmachen, from halten ‘to hold’.Extra examples A sudden shout made them halt in their tracks and look around. All these ideas for expansion were abruptly halted by the outbreak of war. The development programme has been halted in its tracks by this intervention. The strike effectively halted production at the factory. We are failing to halt the destruction of the rainforest. ‘Halt!’ the Major ordered. She criticized his failure to halt the slide in the government’s unpopularity.Idioms
    stop/halt somebody in their tracks, stop/halt/freeze in your tracks
     
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    to suddenly make somebody stop by frightening or surprising them; to suddenly stop because something has frightened or surprised you The question stopped Alice in her tracks. See related entries: Surprise
    See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: halt