Definition of haul verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    haul

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//hɔːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɔːl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they haul
    BrE BrE//hɔːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɔːl//
     
    he / she / it hauls
    BrE BrE//hɔːlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɔːlz//
     
    past simple hauled
    BrE BrE//hɔːld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɔːld//
     
    past participle hauled
    BrE BrE//hɔːld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//hɔːld//
     
    -ing form hauling
    BrE BrE//ˈhɔːlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈhɔːlɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1to pull something/somebody with a lot of effort haul something/somebody The wagons were hauled by horses. haul something/somebody + adv./prep. He reached down and hauled Liz up onto the wall. The car was hauled out of the river. fishermen hauling in their nets Synonymspulldrag draw haul tow tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially towards or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you:Pull the chair nearer the table. They use oxen to pull their carts.drag to pull somebody/​something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort:The sack is too heavy to lift—you’ll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move somebody/​something by pulling them/​it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage:I drew my chair closer to the fire. a horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull somebody/​something to a particular place with a lot of effort:Fishermen were hauling in their nets.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something towards you, often upwards towards you. Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does. tow to pull a car, boat or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain:Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull somebody/​something hard in a particular direction:She tried to escape but he tugged her back.Patterns to pull/​drag/​draw/​haul/​tow/​tug somebody/​something along/​down/​towards something to pull/​drag/​draw/​haul/​tow somebody/​something behind you to pull/​drag/​draw/​haul a cart/​sledge to pull/​draw a coach/​carriage to pull/​haul/​tow a truck horses pull/​draw/​haul something dogs pull/​drag/​haul something
  2. 2haul yourself up/out of, etc. to move yourself somewhere slowly and with a lot of effort She hauled herself out of bed. He hauled himself up.
  3. 3haul somebody + adv./prep. to force somebody to go somewhere they do not want to go A number of suspects have been hauled in for questioning. He was hauled off to jail.
  4. 4[usually passive] haul somebody (up) before somebody/something to make somebody appear in court in order to be judged He was hauled up before the local magistrates for dangerous driving.
  5. Word Origin mid 16th cent. (originally in the nautical sense ‘trim sails for sailing closer to the wind’): variant of hale ‘drag with force’.Extra examples Fishermen were hauling in their nets. He managed to haul himself over the wall. He reached down and hauled her up onto the ledge. I couldn’t haul him away from the fight. Laura hauled herself up from the sofa. She hauled herself into a sitting position. She hauled him back onto the dance floor. The creature began to haul itself out of the water. The trucks were hauled by steam locomotives. They had to use ropes to haul him out of the water. They were hauled off to jail.Idioms
    haul somebody over the coals(British English)(North American English rake somebody over the coals)
     
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    to criticize somebody severely because they have done something wrong I was hauled over the coals by my boss for being late.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: haul