Definition of humiliate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

humiliate

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they humiliate
BrE BrE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪt//
 
he / she / it humiliates
BrE BrE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪts//
 
past simple humiliated
BrE BrE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪtɪd//
 
past participle humiliated
BrE BrE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪtɪd//
 
-ing form humiliating
BrE BrE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//hjuːˈmɪlieɪtɪŋ//
 
Embarrassment
 
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humiliate somebody/yourself/something to make somebody feel ashamed or stupid and lose the respect of other people I didn't want to humiliate her in front of her colleagues. I've never felt so humiliated. How could I humiliate myself like that? The party was humiliated in the recent elections. See related entries: Embarrassment Word Origin mid 16th cent. (earlier (late Middle English) as humiliation): from late Latin humiliat- ‘made humble’, from the verb humiliare, from humilis ‘low, lowly’, from humus ‘ground’. The original meaning was ‘bring low’; the current sense dates from the mid 18th cent.Extra examples I have never felt so humiliated in all my life. Lowe was publicly humiliated by his colleagues. She felt completely humiliated. I didn’t want to humiliate her in front of her colleagues. I’ve never felt so humiliated. There was no need to humiliate herself over something so petty.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: humiliate