English

Definition of humour verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

humour

 verb
(especially US English humor) verb
BrE BrE//ˈhjuːmə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhjuːmər//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they humour
BrE BrE//ˈhjuːmə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhjuːmər//
 
he / she / it humours
BrE BrE//ˈhjuːməz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhjuːmərz//
 
past simple humoured
BrE BrE//ˈhjuːməd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhjuːmərd//
 
past participle humoured
BrE BrE//ˈhjuːməd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhjuːmərd//
 
-ing form humouring
BrE BrE//ˈhjuːmərɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈhjuːmərɪŋ//
 
 
jump to other results
humour somebody to agree with somebody’s wishes, even if they seem unreasonable, in order to keep the person happy She thought it best to humour him rather than get into an argument. Word Origin Middle English: via Old French from Latin humor ‘moisture’, from humere ‘be moist’. The original sense was ‘bodily fluid’ (surviving in aqueous humour and vitreous humour); it was used specifically for any of the cardinal humours (sense (3)), which led to the sense ‘mental disposition’ (thought to be caused by the relative proportions of the humours). This led, in the 16th cent., to the senses ‘mood’ (sense (2)) and ‘whim’, hence to humour someone ‘to indulge a person's whim’. Sense (1) dates from the late 16th cent.