English

Definition of impinge verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

impinge

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ɪmˈpɪndʒ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpɪndʒ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they impinge
BrE BrE//ɪmˈpɪndʒ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpɪndʒ//
 
he / she / it impinges
BrE BrE//ɪmˈpɪndʒɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpɪndʒɪz//
 
past simple impinged
BrE BrE//ɪmˈpɪndʒd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpɪndʒd//
 
past participle impinged
BrE BrE//ɪmˈpɪndʒd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpɪndʒd//
 
-ing form impinging
BrE BrE//ɪmˈpɪndʒɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpɪndʒɪŋ//
 
 
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[intransitive] impinge (on/upon something/somebody) (formal) to have a noticeable effect on something/somebody, especially a bad one synonym encroach He never allowed his work to impinge on his private life. The preparations for war were beginning to impinge. Word Origin mid 16th cent.: from Latin impingere ‘drive something in or at’, from in- ‘into’ + pangere ‘fix, drive’. The word originally meant ‘thrust at forcibly’, then ‘come into forcible contact’; hence ‘encroach’ (mid 18th cent.).Extra examples actions which seriously impinge on other people’s personal freedoms measures which directly or indirectly impinge upon women’s lives Environmental stimuli are constantly impinging upon our sensory systems. It is difficult to separate the factors that impinge upon market efficiency. Libel laws do in other respects impinge upon the freedom of the press.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: impinge